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Who were the top Fortnite streamers of Season 9?

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Fortnite Season 9 ended with a bang and players are transitioning into a post-World-Cup Fortnite world with Season X.

While BRUTE wreak havoc across the map, Fortnite streamers are doing big numbers that always happen during the start of a new season – Ninja is just doing his on another platform.

But the whole of Season 9 was amazing for Fortnite streamers. The run-up to the World Cup saw Tfue and Cloak almost qualify for the event while being watched by an audience of nearly 300,000.

Other streamers also set personal bests and the top channels shifted as the season went on.

Who were the most watched Fortnite streamers in Season 9?

Quick note on this data before we start. I got this data from Stream Elements in partnership with Sully Gnome. Stream Elements is the company that provides all the different aspects of stream overlays to many of your favorite streamers. Sully Gnome is a great source for data from streams and lets you compare different channels and games over time.

This data is technically for the past 90 days and that includes six days that weren’t in Fortnite Season 9.

#1 Tfue – 26.3 Million Hours Watched

Besides the multiple lawsuits, life is good for Tfue

Tfue streamed for 504 hours and averaged over 50,000 viewers a stream. That was good enough to make him not only the highest Fortnite streamer but the most watched individual streamer on the internet. He was carried by his World Cup qualifier broadcasts and drama with FaZe Clan that had him in center focus all season.

#2 Ninja – 18.2 Million Hours Watched

Ninja leaves Twitch and takes his audience with him

While he may not be on top anymore, Ninja’s audience is still massive. He streamed for 100 hours less than Tfue during the season but also had an average audience that was 10,000 less. That helps show just how massive of a gap Tfue has on the rest of the crowd. Still, Mixer has to be happy knowing they grabbed a boatload of viewers.

#3 NICKMERCS – 9.8 Million Hours Watched

100 Thieves who? NICKMERCS is doing fine without em

The MFAM was growing last season. NICKMERCS was able to grab the third spot on this list, even though he has just half the viewers of Ninja and nearly 1/3 the viewers of Tfue. His apparently messy break up with 100 Thieves also didn’t seem to impact his viewers.

#4 Dakotaz – 8.3 Million Hours Watched

600 hours on the dot in streaming time for Dakotaz during the season. Thats more than anyone else in the top ten, except one person who went live an incredible amount.

While streaming often can look like a dream job, the grind that comes with being one of the best streamers is often grueling.

#5 Symfuhny – 7.1 Million Hours Watched

The storyline surrounding Brooke helped keep Symfuhny in the public spotlight and he reaped the rewards as he streamed for an insane 647 hours in the season. To put that in perspective, that means streaming 7.1 hours every single day for 90 days.

#6 – Timthetatman – 6 Million Hours Watched

His unique personality has his streams poppin whenever he is live

I was going to stop at five but wanted to include six to show the contrast between streamers. While Sym was streaming that insane schedule, Tim only was live for 290 hours. When he was live, he averaged twice the amount of viewers Sym did.

Other Notes from the Data

  • I ignored the main Fortnite stream which finished in sixth place overall, and SolaryFortnite as they used a rotating group of streamers to be live for 1,500 hours and finished in fourth place.
  • The next five entries on the list would be: Hamlinz, Chap, mrfreshasian, Gotaga and trymacs.
  • Tfue’s famed duo partner Cloak didn’t get much of an audience boost despite playing with Tfue, he finished in 28th place.
  • Ninja and Tfue combined for 44.5 million hours watched. You have to combine the next eight individual streamers to reach that amount of hours watched.

Original Content

A game of chess: an interview with a Fortnite cheat developer

We spoke with a cheat developer about cheating in Fortnite, the Fortnite anti-cheat, and the mentality of a cheat developer.

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On July 31, we covered the story of a Fortnite player known as Bman. Bman was exposed for allegedly using cheats during the Bugha Cup and Cash Cups leading up to this tournament. His trio teammates in the Bugha Cup were the ones to expose him.

Zykoma, one of Bman’s former teammates, tweeted several clips that showed Bman tracking players that should be invisible to him. In the tweet, he wrote, “I’m posting this to show how easily these hacks are accessible and can go multiple tournaments undetected.”

After discussing the topic with the players involved, I was sent some information on how Bman got these cheats. One thing led to another and I found myself in a Discord server for a cheat developer – selling cheats for Fortnite, PUBG, and Apex Legends. I was directed to one of the Discord admins and creators of the cheats. For the purpose of this article, he will be referred to as “Clay,” to avoid potential misuse of this feature for promotional purposes.

Clay agreed to be interviewed and provided some insight into cheating in Fortnite along with general information about himself and why he does what he does. According to Clay, he and his partner(s) sell one of the only effective cheats that gets through the Fortnite anti-cheat. He could not confirm nor deny whether these were the cheats that Bman used before his disqualification from the Bugha Cup.

I went into this conversation thinking that Clay would talk about the abundance of cheaters in Fortnite and how easy it is to get around their anti-cheat. I thought I’d find someone who just wants to watch the world burn – sending as many cheaters into a game as they could. As it turns out, neither assumption ended up being true. Let’s get into it.

An interview with a Fortnite cheat developer

People are calling out the Fortnite anti-cheat. Would the Valorant anti-cheat detect this type of cheat? I know that’s supposed to be much more advanced than other games.

The Valorant anti-cheat is definitely good, presumably the best anti-cheat since ESEA, both insanely invasive in ways that the communities have already found out about without any developers having to prove.

It’s highly unlikely that any anti-cheat can detect our cheat(s) as it’s operating at an extremely low level compared to what they’re used to, and if they could see how we do it then they’d most likely steal some of our ideas.

In Fortnite – with public tournaments and open qualifiers – there seems to be a lot more incentive to use cheats to earn money. The same is true for developing cheats, I assume.

To be honest, we love what we do, and making money is simply an addition to it, we don’t do this for a living or else we’d have many more customers.

Cheating has been around since forever, it has definitely changed and evolved from even year-to-year, but it’s still cheating. The difference is definitely huge between players using it for content or public matches, as opposed to using it to earn tons of money but along with that, there are also greater risks. When you start trying to use third-party software or even non-tool assisted cheating for money, that’s when legal actions begin to become a risk.

You said you do it for the love of the game and not for the money. What do you love about it? Getting around the system? Trying to have the best product?

Bypassing anti-cheats is a hobby, similar to how cheating in games is a hobby. It’s enjoyable to bypass something that isn’t supposed to be bypassed, and ahead of that we also provide for someone else’s hobby which is cheating in a game. The money made isn’t important, it’s a bonus to what we do.

We don’t even try to compete to have the best product, we’re known for having the most secure products for many years now but we don’t even attempt to mass-sell or advertise what we do, it simply comes to us because of how well we do it. It’s simply a hobby, and when you do it well, people realize it.

Besides, when we see anti-cheats doing illegal stuff like pulling information from user’s computers or even dumping memory – we want them to realize we can see what they’re doing. What we do is just as illegal as what they do, probably even less illegal as they’re doing it to millions of players. Well, it would be illegal but no one cares about the TOS each player agrees to. I guess cheaters and RE’s (reverse engineers) just enjoy being on the opposite side.

The prices you list are quite expensive for a hobby. What do you think people get out of cheating in a game if not money and notoriety? Calling it a hobby suggests that people are doing it for fun – not trying to earn money or make a name for themselves.

There are definitely people who just cheat as a hobby, it may require an investment but when there’s only one undetected cheat – people are willing to pay any price. Of course, there are people who also do it to gain an advantage and win tournaments, but those rarely ever continuously cheat.

Would you say that yours is the only undetectable cheat in a particular game?

In the specific game we’re talking about (Fortnite), yes. At least the only one undetected that isn’t extremely private and selling for over $2,000 a month.

Okay. So in your opinion, cheating in Fortnite isn’t as widespread as people seem to think it is? Right now, a lot of pros are suspicious.

Cheating with third-party programs isn’t as big as people think it is. There may be other forms of cheating, but not with third-party programs like this, as it’s extremely rare or difficult for someone to get their hands on something like this.

I did see someone named “Zygama” (Zykoma) or something like that saying something along the lines of “I want to spread awareness to show how easy it is for people to get cheats that can go multiple tournaments without being banned.” This is extremely false.

I’m in contact with many other developers and well-known cheaters who have tried numerous cheats and created cheats who haven’t even been able to go a few days without getting banned.

The cheat we’re offering isn’t something out of the ordinary, and we aren’t regular RE’s with basic knowledge. We’ve been making cheats for over a decade, and to make this cheat as safe and undetected as it has cost us many weeks of reversing and studying how the anti-cheats work, luckily we didn’t go out of our general knowledge as everything they do – we’ve already seen in previous anti-cheats.

Do you play Fortnite or any of the other games you have cheats for? When you do play, do you cheat?

I personally don’t play the games, or if I do play them it’s only with intentions to add/debug something about the cheat. I’m not entirely a gamer, not anymore at least.

“It bothers me when people say ‘fix your anti-cheat’ to developers who work day and night to catch a cheat that snuck past what they took months developing.”

Would you ever switch sides and work for the good guys, catching cheaters and making anti-cheats?

Creating an anti-cheat was something a colleague and I have thought about, but there’s something better about being the “bad guys”.

Besides, when you’re working on this side of the field not only are you learning the tricks anti-cheat developers are using, but you’re also using your full knowledge to create new ideas while also understanding other’s ideas. Which is something anti-cheat developers can’t do, unless they get access to that specific cheat.

I will say that it bothers me when people say “fix your anticheat” to developers who work day and night to catch a cheat that snuck past what they took months developing. They truly work hard, but it’s not an easy task to get rid of every single cheat available to people. Then when certain cheats like this one comes up, that they’ve never seen before or have an idea how it works – they can’t do anything but spend half of their salary on getting their hands on the cheat to detect it.

This cheat is definitely going to be something head-breaking for them to solve though, and they will learn a lot from it if, and only if they are able to figure out even a small portion of it.

I want to get back to the prevalence of cheating in Fortnite. This past weekend the topic blew up with the FNCS. Has anything changed or is that statement still true?

I don’t know of any cheats that are undetected, at all – other than us. I think Fortnite cheating is really dead, and I don’t see it taking any turn anytime soon. Specifically speaking about third-party program cheating, because other forms of cheating may definitely be common.

Of course, teaming and all of that, but we’ve seen a ton of clips of players with “suspicious” aim and tracking from this weekend. Do you think players are seeing something in clips that isn’t there or are more players actually using cheats?

We opened 5 slots prior to all of these tournaments. I’m not claiming any of those users are my customers and there have been numerous clips of people having suspicious aim who are simply just good.

It’s highly unlikely that these users are cheating, but I do think Fortnite is becoming scared of what’s going on and are enforcing bans without their anti-cheat picking up a clue. They’re definitely desperate to clean up their game, but as I said it’s highly unlikely that these players are using cheats unless they’re paying what they make from the tournaments to only keep the publicity.

Can you clarify what the “slots” mean?

We have limited slots for each product we offer in order to prevent an abundance of cheaters, it’s also an easier and more secure way to handle the cheats as opposed to mass-selling it. Usually, we have 25 slots for our products, but for Fortnite, we’d like it a bit more private as there are no other cheats that offer the security we offer.

Really, so at one time only 5 people were cheating using your cheats during the FNCS?

Correct, as I said it’s very rare to have secure cheats and we don’t want to hurt the game any more than we already do.

“This is definitely like a game of chess though, and I hope they’re enjoying it the way I am; except I’m a few moves ahead at the moment.”

You have an interesting stance on game development. Not wanting to hurt the game, standing up for anti-cheat developers, etc.

Truth is I like what I do, I’m not attempting to hurt anyone by doing this. There is a lot that could be bragged about, but there’s a limit to when you can brag.

The anti-cheat developers are trying their hardest, but there’s always someone who’s better, just as I’m sure there’s someone better than us – they just haven’t shown up yet. This is definitely like a game of chess though, and I hope they’re enjoying it the way I am; except I’m a few moves ahead at the moment.

The takeaway

My primary takeaway from this conversation was this: according to (self-proclaimed) one of the only successful Fortnite cheat providers on the internet, there aren’t a ton of cheaters in Fortnite, especially in official tournaments. There are, undoubtedly, people using third-party cheats in Fortnite tournaments, but they aren’t nearly as common as the professional community seems to think.

What’s more, the Fortnite anti-cheat – which has been getting a lot of flack from pros – is one of the better systems in gaming. It might not be as sophisticated as some, but it’s far better than the anti-cheat in other popular games. According to Clay, their cheats wouldn’t even be registered by the most stringent anti-cheats in gaming, anyway. If you take his claims at face value, then you acknowledge that he’s creating a cheat – unseen in gaming until now.

Cheating will always be a part of gaming. As Clay told me, it’s a game of chess between cheat and anti-cheat developers. There will always be people like Clay, who enjoy skirting the system by developing cheats. There will always be players who purchase these cheats as a way to gain an advantage – or to, simply, anger other players.

I decided to look at the silver lining of the information we received: cheating in Fortnite isn’t that bad. Third-party cheating Fortnite tournaments seems to be even less of an issue.

Sure, some people will get away with it and Epic can’t keep up with everyone. As players, all we can do is keep an eye out and report what we see without getting too paranoid. As Ballatw stated in a tweet, false and frivolous accusations only harm the community.

This appears to be the end of my communication with Clay, for now. He claims to have no knowledge of any particular players who are cheating in Fortnite – although I have my doubts about that. I wouldn’t expect him to admit it if he did. I’m taking some of his claims with a grain of salt, but feel as though he has no reason to lie about most of what he told me.

Hopefully, this interview gives players and developers alike more of an insight into the world of hacking in video games – specifically in Fortnite. Fortnite players can take some comfort in the knowledge that the anti-cheat is strong and catches most of the wrongdoers.

Some cheaters will always slip through the cracks, but those who use third-party software in tournaments are subject to legal action. It’s a huge risk that carries more of a punishment than public humiliation if a player is caught.

I can only hope that this information helps to give some competitive Fortnite players peace of mind, dissuades potential cheaters, and informs those who were interested ideology of a cheat developer. I’ll be answering some questions on the FortniteINTEL Twitter account, so make sure to follow us there.

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Original Content

How to use underwater Reboot Vans in Fortnite Season 3

With a bit of effort and some ingenuity, you can reach the underwater Reboot Vans in Fortnite Season 3.

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For those who have been away from Fortnite for the past week, Fortnite Season 3 released and flooded the map. We have some new POIs, new weapons, and new ways to play the game.

Reboot Vans were an unfortunate casualty of the new season. Epic didn’t seem to add many of them in the new POIs, and they sunk a portion of the existing vans around the map. Finding a place to safely reboot your teammates can be more difficult than ever.

fortnite-season-8-eight-s8-respawn-van-truck-locations-full-map-guide-how-to

Some of the sunken Reboot vans still show up on the map, making things even more confusing. You could rotate to an area, only to realize that the Reboot Van isn’t available.

The water will recede over the coming weeks, so these sunken Reboot Vans will come into play. One player found a way to get to the underwater Reboot Vans early, however. Reddit user u/MayorOfKenja got to one of these using a Motorboat, builds, and some ingenuity.

It’s unclear how, exactly, this player builds so deep under the water. As most of you know, Season 3 has greatly improved our abilities to build over the water-covered areas. If you can get your pieces to place down there, then you could be able to access this Reboot Van, as well.

Admittedly, this is going to be a tough one to replicate. Not only are you going to have to spend several minutes building your way down there, but you’ll have to make sure you have enough HP to survive the drowning effect. If you can pull it off, we’d love to see it!

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Rumors

How to make an underwater map work in Fortnite Season 3

“SpongeBob physics” might be the only way that an underwater map will work in Fortnite Season 3.

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Fortnite Season 3 is just over a week away, and rumors are swirling about what it will bring. It seems to be all but confirmed that a flood will overtake the map, which has fans equally exciting and worried.

An underwater map could be amazing or it could be awful. Swimming in Fortnite is notoriously inconsistent and annoying. All-water zones are the worst, and we can’t imagine a map that’s entirely comprised of the water physics from Seasons 1 and 2.

A Fortnite map that’s entirely underwater and forces players to swim all of the time would likely be a disaster. It would change the game far too much, and most players would probably be turned off after a couple of weeks – not to mention all of the bugs that would likely arise from this mechanic.

That’s why we’re predicting something different. We saw a post on Reddit from u/JjGuyy0 that perfectly illustrates what we think will happen when Season 3 comes out.

Instead of swimming and floating under the water, we’re predicting what JjGuyy0 calls, “SpongeBob physics.” Even if the crossover doesn’t happen, his presence can be felt through the gameplay.

What we mean by this is that players won’t float. Instead, the underwater part of the map will act like the normal map – as is the case in SpongeBob. Players will sink to the bottom and use new water-based vehicles to move around.

Via: u/JjGuyy0

We heard rumors about a shark vehicle, but the specifics from JjGuyy0 are only speculation. The mechanics of the islands make sense, however, and we expect to see something similar to what u/JjGuyy0 has proposed.

In our opinion, “SpongeBob physics” is the only way to make an underwater Fortnite map work. It will change little other than the aesthetics of the map, which will be a perfect breath of fresh air for the community. Let’s hope that we’re right.

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