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Tfue explains why he quit Fortnite

Turner ‘Tfue’ Tenney appeared on the Brand Risk Podcast, explaining why he left Fortnite.

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Turner ‘Tfue’ Tenney is up there with Ninja as a true Fortnite legend – a streamer who had a small following before the game came out and exploded once it gained popularity. There was a time when Tfue would regularly garner 100,000 viewers on his Fortnite streams – especially when he was competing.

For a long time, Tfue was considered the best player in the game. His stream grew to the point where he was close to – if not the – most subscribed channel on all of Twitch.

He helped to catapult the careers of several young Fortnite pros, as well, by teaming up with them for competitive events. Some say that he has the best eye for talent in the game – picking up players like Khanada and Scoped before most of the community knew who they were.

After two + years of streaming Fortnite every day, Tfue grew visibly frustrated with the game he once loved. When Warzone came out and popular Fortnite streamers started moving over, Tfue decided to make the switch. The fanbase he had built playing Fortnite was strong enough to follow him to whichever game he chose, and Tfue moved away from Fortnite.

Although Tfue flirted with the idea of returning to Fortnite, he still hasn’t come back in any meaningful way. Recently, he appeared on the Brand Risk Podcast with Arab and Quick to discuss his career. Of course, this included why he left the game that helped him become a household name in the gaming space.

Tfue began by citing the typical reason why streamers leave a game: burnout. “Two years of cranking 90s was just too much,” he explained. “I had to spice it up and play other things. Plus, I felt like I milked the game so much that, like, me playing it was almost digging myself into a pit.”

When asked to expand, Tfue went on to say, “I got to the point where the only reason I was playing it was for viewers and for my career. I just stopped caring about that and felt like I milked Fortnite for all that was worth, considering I was blowing up at the peak of it. Anyone playing Fortnite now knows who I am. If I keep playing it, it’s not like I’m going to gain new followers.”

(Topic starts at 2:14)

Interestingly, for someone who called for the death of Fortnite countless times while he was playing it, Tfue said that Fortnite would never fully die as H1Z1 did. “I feel like Fortnite was too big at its peak to ever get to that point,” he explained. “I fee like it will die down, but I don’t think it will ever actually die.”

Tfue has spoken about his departure from Fortnite in the past, but this is the first time he’s given an in-depth explanation with some distance from the game. We may see him return to Fortnite in the future, but probably not for a while. The full hour-long podcast is available on YouTube and Spotify. We suggest that fans of Tfue listen to the whole episode. The trio get into some interesting topics.

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Lazarbeam Fortnite skin: release date, first look & more

Lazarbeam is getting a Fortnite skin in the Fortnite Icon Series. Take a look at the new skin, bundle, and release date.

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Fortnite Lazarbeam skin

On March 1, Epic Games and Lazarbeam announced that they Australian YouTube star would be the next creator to be included in the Fortnite Icon Series with a new skin bundle.

The Fortnite Icon Series gives creators a way to become immortalized in one of their favorite video games: Fortnite. This began with one of the pioneers of Fortnite, Ninja, and has since expanded to include Loserfruit, Lachlan, and TheGrefg.

It looks like popular Australian YouTuber and streamer, Lannan “Lazarbeam” Eacott will be the next creator featured in the series. He first teased the announcement with a scheduled video, then showcased his skin at 5:00 PM EST on March 1.

Lazarbeam Fortnite skin release date

Lazarbeam’s Fortnite Icon Series skin should hit the Item Shop on March 4. He also mentioned some giveaways, which could relate to his YouTube channel or a limited-time tournament, similar to TheGrefg’s Floor is Lava event.

The bundle will come with a skin, and additional variant, the Gingerbread construction worker Back Bling, a sledgehammer pickaxe and an emote that may or may not be built into the outfit.

Fortnite Lazarbeam skin

We’ll update you when we get closer to the release date of Lazarbeam’s Fortnite skin. We should see some datamined images of the skin in the next Fortnite patch, so stay tuned for that as well.

In the meantime, make sure to follow us on Twitter @FortniteINTEL so you never miss out on the latest Fortnite news.

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Lazarbeam teases new Fortnite Icon Series skin

Is Lazarbeam getting a Fortnite skin? That’s what the internet is wondering after the YouTuber teased an announcement on March 1.

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Lazarbeam Fortnite Icon Series

Is Lazarbeam getting a Fortnite skin? We explore the YouTuber’s new teaser and supporting evidence of an Icon Series skin.

Since the release of Ninja’s Fortnite skin, fans of the game have been speculating about which creators could be next. We’ve now seen Loserfruit, Lachlan, and TheGrefg receive skins in Fortnite, along with celebrities like Travis Scott and Marshmello.

There are still some big names left on the board. Streamers like Nick Eh 30 and SypherPK have received bundles for their most-used items, but who will be the next creator to enter the Icon Series?

Well, according to Lazarbeam, it could be him.

Lazarbeam Icon Series Skin

On March 1, Lazarbeam scheduled a video entitled, “MY FORTNITE SKIN REVEAL.” Fans immediately wondered whether or not the Australian YouTuber – known for his gags – was pulling a fast one on his fanbase.

We still don’t know whether or not this announcement is legitimate, but the early signs point to it being the real deal. Lazarbeam even assured his followers that it isn’t clickbait.

Fortnite data miner, iFireMonkey, added further legitimacy to the announcement by looking at the files for the planned video.

“The Lazarbeam Icon Series video appears to be only 2 Minutes and 25 Seconds long according to the videos content details,” he wrote on Twitter. “Due to the video length being pretty short, I would say this is 99% confirmed to be his icon series skin.”

The video is scheduled to release at 5:00 PM EST (2:00 PST), so we’ll know more when we can watch Lazarbeam’s announcement.

If this is Lazarbeam’s entrance to the Icon Series, it would be the first time that a creator revealed their skin before it was leaked. This could be why Epic and Lazarbeam are announcing it now – before it enters the game files for data miners to find.

Of course, there’s still a small chance that we’re one of the many fans who are taking the bait. We’ll let you know when we see the video in a few hours.

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72hrs exposes Arena & tournament instant Gold exploit

Fortnite streamer Tom “72hrs” Mulligan exposed a massive Gold Bar exploit for Arena and the Season 5 FNCS.

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Fortnite gold tournament exploit

Fortnite is no stranger to exploits, but streamer Tom “72hrs” Mulligan uncovered a Gold Bar strategy that players can use to cheat in the Season 5 FNCS.

Fortnite Season 5 introduced Gold Bars to the game – a new currency that players can use to upgrade weapons, buy Exotics, and otherwise improve their setup.

In base Fortnite, Gold Bars carry over from game to game. In Arena and tournament play, they don’t, meaning you start every match with 0 Gold Bars. This fact has been under some criticism, as it puts weapon upgrades behind an in-game paywall, making RNG more of a factor in competitive matches and tournaments.

Well, some players have found a way around that, and streamer Tom “72hrs” Mulligan exposed this exploit to the public.

Fortnite Gold Bar exploit

The exploit revolves around timed quests in Fortnite – something that Epic probably overlooked when implementing the system. You can grab quests from NPCs that last 60 minutes, rather than for one game – meaning you can complete them in the next game you play.

These quests are the same in Arena as they are in public matches. Theoretically, you can grab three quests in one match, back out, and get all of the Gold rewards in your next Arena match.

This is an exploit that should be addressed for Arena Mode, but its real impact can be felt in tournaments. Players can hop into a public match, stack-up on quests, complete 90% of each quest, then play an FNCS qualification game while finishing all of the quests at once for instant Gold Bars.

“People wouldn’t even know if you don’t stream,” Tom explained. “In replay, it doesn’t show you get Gold, so the only way you’d know if people were doing this is if you take the time to slowly count all the Gold that they actually got.”

Your initial thought might be, “Since 72hrs made this video, more people are going to abuse the system.” This is probably right, but there were plenty of people who knew about this exploit before the video went live. Tom’s former teammate, Chap, even admitted that he already knew about the exploit in the former streamer’s chat.

Now, the exploit is out in the open and Epic have to do something about it. Plenty of FNCS players don’t stream their matches for a variety of reasons. As 72hrs said, there’s no way of knowing that these players used the exploit unless you’re specifically looking for it in Replay Mode.

“You gotta think about it like this, too,” 72hrs continued, “So many people are accidentally doing it – they don’t even know. They’re playing pubs, they picked up a quest, they’re like, ‘I’m not f***in’ fueling up a car today, I’ll do it later.’ And then they go into FNCS … and all of a sudden they’re like, ‘Wait, I can upgrade, I have 500 Gold.'”

72hrs presented a question towards the end of the video: is it cheating? It’s hard to say that this is cheating since it’s so easy to accidentally trigger the exploit. Now that it’s out there, though, we can expect more players to take advantage of it in the Season 5 FNCS.

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