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Tfue calls for Epic to remove wall-taking from Fortnite

Tfue calls taking walls in Fortnite “unfair” and calls for Epic to remove the system.

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Taking walls in Fortnite has been a hot topic since the box-fighting meta began. Players with low ping can consistently take the building pieces of players with high ping.

This wasn’t always the case. At one point, Epic tried to address the issue by adding a 50/50 coin-flip system to taking structures. The game would flip a coin to determine which player could place their piece.

Most pros were happy about this switch, but Epic seemed to inexplicably revert the change when Chapter 2 came out. This was during the long night of little communication, but Epic claimed that the system was working as intended.

It’s clear that having low ping matters to anyone who regularly plays Fortnite – regardless of whether or not Epic claims to have changed any of the figures. A player with 0 ping will take the wall of nearly anyone in the lobby – as anyone with this ping will freely admit.

Tfue, on the other hand, has notoriously high ping. The streamer lives in Florida and regularly experiences around 40-60 ping in his games. When you’re competing at the top level, this can be a drastic disadvantage.

Via: HollywoodFix

During a recent stream, another player took Tfue’s wall on the first try – nothing out of the ordinary for Tfue. “Kid literally didn’t even know how to play the game but still takes my wall,” Tfue said after he was eliminated.

“Taking walls should not be a thing. You shouldn’t be able to take anyone’s wall, ever,” he continued. “Until they can figure out a f**king fair way, you know? … It’s like somebody taking f**king steroids in the UFC and then somebody not taking steroids. It’s like, how is that fair?

(0:22 for mobile viewers)

Tfue is, of course, talking about the ping discrepancy that gives some players a massive advantage over others. Having lower ping will give you a leg up in any game, but it’s particularly noticeable in Fortnite.

Tfue’s solution probably isn’t the best, but it’s never ideal when a particular player has an inherent advantage based on where they live. We’ll have to wait and see if Epic try to address this problem a second time.

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Ninja announces first YouTube Stream

Tyler ‘Ninja’ Blevins has announced his first stream on YouTube.

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Update 7/8 12:54 PM: According to Slasher, Ninja has yet to sign an exclusive deal with any platform. This first stream is not part of any deal. “Maybe he’ll stream on Twitch too.”

Original article: On July 8, one of the most popular Fortnite streamers on any platform, Tyler ‘Ninja’ Blevins, announced that he’d be beginning the next chapter of his streaming career on YouTube. This news comes after weeks of speculation as to where Ninja and Shroud would land following Mixer’s shutdown.

To many fans, this doesn’t come as much of a surprise. Ninja was the first streamer to sign an exclusive deal with Mixer, and Twitch didn’t seem to take too kindly to his leaving. Twitch immediately removed Ninja’s partnership and even started promoting other Fortnite streams on his channel. The situation came to a head when a channel view-botted their way to the top of the Fortnite category while streaming pornographic content. This was, of course, promoted in Ninja’s old channel.

Additionally, Ninja’s good friend, Jack ‘CourageJD’ Dunlop has been incredibly successful after making the switch to YouTube. The cherry on top of this speculation sundae was that Ninja accidentally scheduled a public test stream on YouTube on July 7. His move was finally confirmed the following day, July 8.

Ninja will be hosting his first YouTube stream today, July 8. Hopefully, this means that the always-entertaining Ninja Battles Fortnite tournament series can resume – a weekly dose of high-level, invitation-only competitive Fortnite gameplay.

At the time of writing, Ninja has only tweeted his YouTube stream for all of his followers. This does not mean that he has signed an exclusive deal – only that he wants to get back to streaming. We’ll update this post when he goes live and gives the fans some additional information.

Ninja will look to continue his growth on YouTube, focusing on creating videos and streams for his fans. We’re excited to see how many people tune-in for Ninja’s first YouTube stream. It’s great to have one of the faces of Fortnite back on the streaming grind.

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SypherPK offers several solutions to Fortnite’s biggest problem

SypherPK gives his thoughts on how Fortnite can solve the problem of Fortnite lobbies dying out too quickly.

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There are always going to be some problems in Fortnite. As is the case with any popular game, fans will always have something to complain about – both justifiably and not. Right now, though, the biggest problem in Fortnite is the pacing of public matches.

Nearly every Fortnite match plays out in a similar way as your last one. You land, loot, fight, and then spend the entirety of the mid-game phase battling Marauders and rotating to the zone. Fights are isolated to the early and late-game scenarios because the bulk of the lobby is gone before the first zone closes.

This has been an issue for the entirety of Chapter 2, and possibly longer. It’s more highlighted now, as other games like Warzone and Hyper Scape solve the problem.

Both aforementioned titles make it easy to revive dead teammates – much easier than it is in Fortnite. Warzone also has 150 players in each map, furthering the number of mid-game engagements. Hyper Scape, on the other hand, evenly distributes players to ensure that one location isn’t overrun.

Most players point to skill-based matchmaking as the culprit, but as SypherPK highlighted, this isn’t the issue. In fact, without SBMM, lobbies might dry-out even faster as good players eliminate all of the bad players they encounter.

During a recent stream, Sypher outlined the differences between Hyper Scape, Warzone, and Fortnite. He presented several ways that Fortnite could emulate these Battle Royales to help increase the number of players who survive in each match.

Sypher gave an in-depth explanation as to why Fortnite matches can seem so slow. The general point seems to be that Fortnite players have outgrown the current system as the Battle Royale genre has moved in an aggressive and fast-paced direction.

Many players have discussed upping the player count in public Fortnite matches, but competitive matches suggest that the server stability might now be able to handle it. Instead, Sypher presented a list of other solutions.

  • Making the bus move faster
  • Making gliders faster
  • Spawning players with a weapon
  • Making it easier to reboot teammates
  • Evenly spreading players by default
  • Adding another bus to public matches
  • Adding a Gulag mechanic

These may not all solve the problem that Sypher is trying to address, but they take a stab at it. It’s clear that Epic need to do something about lobbies dying too quickly. New weapons and items won’t solve this one.

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Ninja’s test stream points to potential YouTube signing

Fans are speculating, heavily, that Ninja will be moving to YouTube Gaming.

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Ever since Mixer dissolved overnight, fans of popular streamers have been speculating about where two of the biggest names in gaming will land: Shroud and Ninja. The consensus was that Shroud would return to Twitch, while Ninja would head off to YouTube. Fans of the latter will remember the fallout that Ninja and Twitch had when the streamer left – leaving little chance of the two entities settling their differences.

At the end of the day, YouTube and Twitch were the only two realistic options for these streamers – short of the rumors of a new streaming platform. Both Ninja and Shroud turned down massive contracts from Facebook Gaming, signifying that they wouldn’t want to join their platform for any amount of money.

We haven’t heard any news about where Ninja would land since Mixer shut down. He is, undoubtedly, in the midst of contract negotiations with his future platform, but we hadn’t seen any concrete clues that pointed to Twitch or YouTube.

That was, until July 7 when the streamer scheduled a test stream on YouTube. The scheduled test was set to take place on the same day and, as Hypex stated in a tweet, likely wasn’t supposed to be public. It was, though, and has fans speculating that Ninja is heading to YouTube Gaming.

As we touched on, above, this is far from a surprise. Ninja’s friend, CourageJD, has been killing it on YouTube – actually seeing his viewership increase after switching over from Twitch.

Although this test stream doesn’t confirm anything, it provides us with a strong hint that Ninja is moving to YouTube Gaming. It also tells us that the official announcement may be sooner rather than later. This is all one more step to having one of the biggest Fortnite streamers on any platform back – his incredibly entertaining “Ninja Battles” tournament series with him.

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