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Summit1g stunned by Unknown vs. Clix ‘griefing’ controversy

Summit1g got into it with the pro Fortnite community following his take on the Unknown vs Clix controversy.

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Competitive Fortnite is a whole lot different than a lot of other esports. Griefing, teaming, and drop-spot sharing seem to bee weekly issues within the professional Fortnite community. There’s an incredibly thin line between sharing a drop spot and teaming – something that was explored in-depth following the FaZe Dubs ban in the FNCS.

In Fortnite, most pro players agree that it’s a bad idea to fight off of spawn. As long as their loot path isn’t impeded, most Fortnite players won’t push an opponent who lands with them – unless they’re mad.

That’s what happened during day-one of the FNCS Invitational Grand Finals. Clix eliminated his friendly rival, UnknownxArmy; dancing on his body after the elimination. Unknown didn’t take too kindly to this and decided to grief Clix by pushing him in the latter’s drop spot, Pleasant Park.

Most of these pros know where their opponents land. They constantly play scrimmages with one another and even team-up on occasion. Unknown knew where Clix could be found and pushed him for revenge.

For those who don’t know, this is considered ‘griefing’ in the competitive Fortnite community. Pros look down on this practice and rarely do it to one another. Most of the time, you’ll find no-name players landing on massive streamers to get their name out there.

Unknown even apologized for his actions in a Twitlonger, the following day. The Fortnite professional community is relatively unanimous on this topic.

Summit1G is not a part of the competitive Fortnite community. He has a background in several other competitive games – most notable CS:GO. The streamer was stunned by the controversy that this caused and expressed his amazement on Twitter.

“So if I’m playing Fortnite in an event,” he wrote, “Someone kills me and dances on my body. I get heated and happen to know their preferred landing locations. I’m not allowed to go after him in next round?”

Several competitive Fortnite fans and players jumped onto this tweet, claiming that Summit didn’t know what he was talking about. More than anything, this seems to be a cultural issue.

Fortnite is an environment where griefing is highly disliked, which we tend to take for granted. We could have easily seen a community where griefing was commonplace if people didn’t care about placements as much – especially if there was less money on the line.

Summit continued to double-down on his argument. “Man. Competitive Fortnite is so damn weird,” he wrote. He even suggested that Epic remove the drop phase in competitive Fortnite, which would eliminate mid-tournament griefing.

This would probably be something worth considering if Epic were open to it. It would help cut-down on teaming accusations and griefing, as you wouldn’t be able to change your drop spot mid-tournament. Of course, that would prevent players from making adjustments if they’re losing early-game fights.

Summit eventually relented, saying that he always gives competitive Fortnite players their respect – even if he dislikes the game. He made some interesting points within this argument, though, and questioned whether or not the current competitive Fortnite mentality is the best one.

Events

How to register for Fortnite Chipotle Challenger Series

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Want a chance to play Fortnite for $50,000, a year of free burritos, and compete against top streamers and celebrities? Then here’s how to sign up for the Chipotle Challenger Series #3.

Some of the big names taking part this time include streamers like CouRageJD, Myth, and Ewok, Fortnite pro players Bugha, Aydan, and Mongraal, as well as star athletes like Chelsea’s Christian Pulisic and Josh Hart of the New Orleans Pelicans.

If you want a shot at competing up against these top players and athletes, you’ll need to grab two buddies and sign-up for the trios competition, which begins with qualifiers on September 17 and September 24.

First, you and your two teammates need to meet the following criteria:

  • Age 13+
  • Be a resident of the United States or Canada
  • Have an authentic and legitimate version of Fortnite installed

How to sign up for Chipotle Challenger Series

  1. Head to the tournament’s official Battlefy page.
  2. Make sure you’re signed up to Battlefy and logged in.
  3. Select whichever qualifier you and your trio wish to play in.
  4. Register your team.

Chipotle Challenger Series qualifiers

There are two dates for the qualifiers, with two separate tournaments on each day on NA East and then NA West servers, so make sure to choose the most appropriate qualifier for your trio.

  • Qualifier 1: September 17, 3pm PT – NA East
  • Qualifier 2: September 17, 6pm PT – NA West
  • Qualifier 3: September 24, 3pm PT – NA East
  • Qualifier 4: September 24, 6pm PT – NA West

For more information and to see the full list of competitors, check out the Chipotle Challenger Series hub.

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Esports

FNCS officially returning to Fortnite trios format in Season 4

The Fortnite Champion Series is set to make its grand return to trios action next season.

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FNCS logo

Fortnite Champion Series (FNCS) is back for Chapter 2: Season 4 as Trios competition takes center stage and a few new changes are introduced to address certain issues.

The FNCS competition has always been one of the most prestigious tournaments in the Fortnite scene. Players have been treated to a number of iterations of the popular competition and now, it’s set to return once again for Season 4.

Marvel heroes and villains have taken over the battle royale map, and it’s up to Trios to prove who can best wield their powers. While previous seasons have highlighted solo, duo, and quads competition, Season 4 is all about Trios. The latest edition of the Champion Series is exclusively for three-player groups.

From the new format changes to when it all kicks off, we’ve got you covered with a complete rundown.

FNCS Season 4 dates

FNCS competition will be for Trios only in Chapter 2: Season 4.

Throughout the Season 4 competition, there are four key periods to keep in mind. While the first week kicks off on October 9, there’s plenty to keep in mind throughout the weeks that follow. These are the dates for FNCS Season 4:

  • FNCS Week 1: October 9 – October 11
  • FNCS Week 2: October 16 – October 18
  • FNCS Week 3: October 23 – October 25
  • FNCS Finals: October 29 – November 1

Each week of the competition will follow a similar format to what players have grown accustomed to. Teams will first compete in open qualifiers. Only the top 33 Trios will then advance to the next two days of that particular week.

Read More: How to complete the Groot ‘Awakening’ challenges

The most successful teams will then earn a spot in the Finals. There’s also a new ‘Wildcard match’ that provides one last chance at making the final round.

FNCS Season 4 format

You and two allies could push through to the finals if you play well enough.

With Trios in the spotlight this season, you’ll need to form the most powerful three-person team possible. Each week, your team can drop into open qualifiers and battle against others for points. If you earn enough points, you’ll advance through to the finals of that particular week before joining the top 33 to fight for instant qualification.

The very best lineups will all make it through to the Grand Final showdown starting October 29. As usual, FNCS will be taking place in all of the familiar regions from previous seasons. That includes NA-West, NA-East, South America, EU, Middle East, Asia, and OCE.

Read More: How to unlock the Shadow Henchmen in Fortnite Season 4

Additionally, Epic Games also laid out a list of new rules and clarifications for the upcoming season. Here’s how FNCS will define ‘Collusion’ and ‘Smurfing’ for the next period of competiton:

COLLUSION

WHAT IS COLLUSION (NOT AN EXHAUSTIVE LIST):

  • Consistently working together with the same opponent. This includes fighting together or working together against a 3rd player or 3rd team who encroaches on a shared location or shared drop spot.
    • With this clarification now in place, we’re now taking a greater stand to action if conclusive evidence is found linking opponents to common goals together.
  • Staged engagements among colluding teams to deceive event admins. As an example: Manipulating storm surge factors intentionally by trading damage with no intent of elimination.
  • Pickaxe swinging (or other actions) used as a form of signaling to opponents.
  • Sharing loot or leaving items with or for opponents for their gain.
  • Intentionally feeding eliminations to another team.

WHAT ISN’T COLLUSION (NOT AN EXHAUSTIVE LIST): 

  • Consistently dropping in the same location each match.
  • Announcing a drop spot on social media.
    • If you believe you’re good enough to stake your claim publicly on a spot, be prepared to defend it. Players contesting your claim is part of the game, and should be encouraged.
  • Choosing to not engage in combat at certain times.
  • Coaching using the in-game replay tools.

SMURFING OR ILLEGAL RESTARTS

Like last season, smurfing is still disallowed in most prized competitions. We’re splitting the current definition of smurfing into two parts:

  1. Traditional Smurfing: Playing on an alternate account that has a lower Arena Rank than your main account in order to illegally participate in tournaments or events that are only eligible for lower Arena Ranks. This type of smurfing will not be allowed in any official tournaments that are only open to those in lower Arena ranks.
  2. Illegal Restarts: Playing on an alternate account AND a main account in the same tournament window. This type of smurfing will not be allowed in any official tournaments, unless otherwise indicated.

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Leak

Boxfight Arena could be coming to Fortnite Season 4

Arena Boxfighting could be our new favorite way to grind Arena points in Competitive Fortnite.

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Competitive Fortnite has been evolving ever since it was first released back in the early seasons of Chapter 1. Despite this, it’s remained relatively similar, apart from some format and meta changes across multiple seasons.

With competitive Fortnite came the development of player skill and practice methods. Players are now free building and editing to warm up while boxfighitng and playing Zone Wars to hone their mechanics in a practical setting.

Boxfights and Zone Wars were ideas that were created by the community, but Epic have supported them with limited-time game modes in the past – bolstering their popularity. Now, it seems like Epic are ready to take the next step with small-scale competitive modes like these.

One of the Season 4 leaks that passed under the radar was the potential of a new Arena mode found in the game files. FNBRHQ tweeted an image that showed an Arena Boxfighting mode.

This could only be a test event, and we have no idea if/when this is coming to Fortnite. If it does, however, we’re also interested in learning whether or not it scales off of your established Arena points from other modes. If so, this could become the most popular way to grind Arena points.

Either way, any expansion of the competitive Fortnite system is good news. We’ve been calling for an overhaul of the system for a few seasons, now, and this would be a great first step. As always, we’ll let you know when we learn more about this addition to the competitive Fortnite lineup.

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