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Our top 6 wishes for Fortnite Season 3

Six changes that we want to see in Fortnite Chapter 2 Season 3.

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Fortnite Season 3 is, at the time of writing, just over a week away. Rumors are swirling about a second delay, but we haven’t heard anything from Epic. Until we do, we have to assume that the event and new season will happen as planned.

We, like many of you, have a few items on our wishlist for Season 3. Here are the top six things we want to see when the new season comes out on June 11.

A better competitive system

This will be on our wishlist until Epic, finally, give it to us. Why can’t one of the most successful games in history figure out how to make a rewarding competitive system?

We’re going to sound like a broken record to those who have followed us for a while, but it needs to be said: if you’re not competing in tournaments, then there’s no reason to grind Arena Mode. Sure, it’s a fun change of pace when you want to get sweaty, but there are 0 rewards for the time you spend in the Arena.

We need cosmetic rewards that are exclusive to high-level players, de-ranking that punishes people for poor performance, and more tiers so those with 20,000 hype aren’t in the same matches as people with 7,000. It seems simple, but Epic have yet to implement any of this since Arena first came out. Maybe Season 3 will be the time.

Weapon loadout settings

Fortnite players have been asking for this for a long time: a setting that allows us to choose our loadout customization before a match. We’ve all been burned by having a mismatched inventory or been caught swapping weapons mid-fight.

This is an issue that affects all platforms. It seems simple enough to add to the game and would be something that would garner a ton of positive feedback from the community. Just look at this concept from u/GAMERFORXI and tell us you wouldn’t want to see something like it.

Via: u/GAMERFORXI

Enough with the badges!

Is there anyone who would miss the constant notifications of leveling up and earning badges? The community hated this feature in Season 1 but seemed to accept it in Season 2. Epic may have quieted the notifications, but there’s still no option to turn them off.

Epic seems to have tried to copy the achievement system from games like Call of Duty. Unfortunately, it doesn’t translate to Fortnite. In our opinion, it’s time to give up on the system.

Expand the 2-slot system

Here, we’re talking about the two-slot system that Epic used for the Bandage Bazooka. This item is, in our opinion, perfectly balanced by taking two inventory slots.

Why stop there? Other powerful weapons deserve two slots as well. Players have been calling for Heavy Snipers, RPGs, and Miniguns to take up two slots, and we’re inclined to agree.

We like these weapons in Fortnite, but Epic need to punish players for carrying them by making it more of a sacrifice. It’s an easy way to help balance some of the incredibly powerful weapons in Fortnite.

Confirm reset on release/pre-edit setting

This is a two-for-one suggestion that has to do with editing. Controller players are requesting that Epic add a ‘confirm reset on release’ option to help combat the ‘scroll wheel reset’ that KBM players have.

On top of that, everyone has been asking for a ‘disable pre-editing’ setting in Fortnite for a long time. We’ve all been burned by accidentally pre-editing a building piece during a fight. Pre-editing is a niche strategy in the first place, and most players would disable it if they had the option.

More stuff!

We acknowledge that Epic are stuck between a rock and a hard place with this one. During Chapter 1, a chief complaint from competitive players was that Epic changed the game too frequently. Now, in Chapter 2, players are complaining that we aren’t getting enough new content.

The best way to appease everyone would be to separate the loot pools – something that Epic have already started to do. They can add something into public matches and bring it to competitive modes a few weeks later if it’s not an issue. Overwatch already does this with new heroes they add to the roster.

The community got what they asked for in some regard. Epic slowed things down and now we know what that’s like. Now that we’ve seen this version of Fortnite, many of us are willing to go back to the days of frequently added weapons and items, even if we get some duds in the mix.

So, there you have it: our wishlist for Fortnite Season 3. Most of these wishes have been on our list for several seasons, so we’re not getting our hopes up. Still, there’s a chance that Epic incorporate some of these popular adjustments to the new season.

Stay tuned for more Fortnite Season 3 news as it comes. We’ll have everything you need to know leading up to the next Fortnite season.

Editorial

Opinion: Marauders have no place in competitive Fortnite

Marauders may be fine for casual Fortnite modes, but not for competitive ones.

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Epic Games have – at least – given players the impression that they’re dedicated to developing the competitive side of Fortnite in Chapter 2. Chapter 2 Season 1 was a rebirth for Arena and tournament play, with a bare-bones loot pool that sacrificed variety for consistency.

Since then, Epic have kept updating their players and even implemented some much-requested changes to competitive Fortnite. One of the biggest signs of progress was the addition of a two-week trial period for new items. Instead of adding everything to competitive modes right away, they’ll try it out in public matches, first.

Chapter 2 Seasons 1 was widely considered to be the most competitive season in Fortnite history. Season 2 would be up there as well if it weren’t for the NPC Henchmen and bosses that regularly eliminated players in Arena. Instead of revisiting the Henchmen in Season 3, Epic doubled-down on their NPC interference by adding Marauders that randomly spawn across the map.

Marauders aren’t the most difficult thing to deal with, but they can mean certain death if you encounter them in a vulnerable scenario. They offers some worthwhile loot, at times, but they waste your healing items, materials, and ammo. The cost of fighting them is almost always too high, especially in solos.

These new NPC agitators are fine for public matches. In my opinion, they were added to help fill the lull between early and late-game fights. In competitive modes and tournaments, however, they cause more trouble than they’re worth.

Should an NPC have the ability to headshot a player for 200 damage and end their match during a tournament? Should they be tossing stinks that can end the game of someone who is low on HP? Should they be equipped with a Rocket Launcher that can severely damage you? In my opinion, the answer is a resounding, no.

It would be one thing if Marauders were in the game during a team-based FNCS season. This season is solos, however, which means that Marauders have a chance to single-handedly cost some players thousands of dollars. I can’t understand why Epic would want to keep them in Arena, apart from the fact that they are the only place where you can find Stink Bombs.

I’m not a strict competitive player. Some seasons, I make it to Champion League and others I don’t – it’s not a huge deal to me. That being said, my blood boils every time I hear the Marauder music in an Arena game, and I can’t imagine how angry it must make tier-one pros.

Fixing Marauders and Sharks

Sharks tend to be in the same boat (no pun intended) as Marauders. They’re easier to avoid and aren’t as punishing, but still seem like a casual, quirky addition to the game that doesn’t belong in competitive.

Removing Marauders and Sharks from competitive Fortnite would, in my opinion, be the best option. It’s not the only option, however. There’s a way to fix both of these NPC nuisances for competitive modes.

Reddit user Dimmy192 commented on a Marauder post with a sensible suggestion: make Marauders and Sharks passive in Arena and tournament modes. That way, you can still attack them if you want or need their loot. If you don’t want to engage with them, you don’t have to. This also removes the Marauder trickshots that you see, above.

With Solo FNCS around the corner, we haven’t seen the last game-ruining Marauder clip. Players are grinding to Champion League in hopes of placing in a tournament. Marauders and Sharks are interfering with that. In my opinion, that’s completely unfair.

We hope that Epic consider community feedback in a way that they didn’t with the BRUTE. Leave them in public matches but remove them or pacify them in competitive modes. These seem like the only fair, sensible options.

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Editorial

Opinion: Ninja Battles is what we thought professional Fortnite would be

Ninja Battles has shown us that there’s a massive opportunity in invitational Fortnite tournaments.

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When competitive Fortnite was first announced, fans imagined Team Liquid going up against TSM and FaZe. Tfue and Cloakzy were battling Chap and 72hrs for the win. TSM boasted Myth, Daequan, and Hamlinz – three of the best players in the world at the time.

Those were the old days of competitive Fortnite, and they are way behind us. There’s been a massive changing of the guard, partially due to the open qualifiers for major tournaments.

These qualifiers were fantastic for unknown Fortnite players who have since grown their brand. Would people like UnknownxArmy or even Bugha have been invited to the World Cup if it was an invitational? We’re not sure.

IMG: Fortnite Twitter

From a viewership perspective, however, it can be difficult to keep track of the constant turnover in the competitive scene. The leaderboard might be filled with names you’ve never heard of in any given tournament. It’s a double-edged sword that leaves some longtime Fortnite viewers behind.

Now, we have Ninja Battles: an invitation-only tournament that also features some of the biggest names in the competitive scene. Sure, there were a few content creators thrown into the mix, but winning the tournament was no small feat. Many of the household names in competitive Fortnite took part in the event, and the prize pool was a large one for an online tournament.

Ninja Battles Week 1 was an unquestioned success. The best news coming out of the event is that we have five more weeks of competition. After one week, it’s already shown us the version of competitive Fortnite we expected to see, all along.

Of course, there was some controversy during the tournament. ZaxRow has been banned after his cuss-filled post-game interview, and Clix issued an apology after leaving early. On top of that, the lack of Arena Mode caused each game to end in a heal-off.

These pros have seen the error of their ways, however, and Ninja Battles will take place in Arena Mode going forward. Ninja stated that the tournament gave him “old competitive Fornite” vibes, and he was dead-on. This was what many of us wanted competitive Fortnite to be.

The participants, largely, loved their experience as well. Nearly every competitor praised the tournament on Twitter. There were no complaints, no in-game controversies, no accusations of teaming – nothing that’s been plaguing the mainstream competitive scene for over a year.

We have several more weeks of Ninja Battles to look forward to, but hopefully, it doesn’t end there. Ninja Battles has shown us that invitational tournaments might be the best format for Fortnite – at least from a viewership perspective.

The FNCS and all other Fortnite tournaments will have their place, but the true ceiling of competitive success may lie in private, invitational tournaments.

Let’s hope that organizers, teams, and companies take note of this success and support this version of the competitive scene going forward. If we get more of what we had last night, then competitive Fortnite has some massive potential.

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Editorial

Opinion: are rare and OG skins bad for Fortnite players?

The rerelease of the Recon Expert skin begs the question: is keeping skins exclusive to longtime players bad for the Fortnite community? We explore this topic.

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OG Fortnite skins: few have them and everyone wants them. Those who have the OG Ghoul Trooper, Skull Trooper, and Renegade Raider can flaunt their Fortnite experience in every lobby they enter.

Is this a good thing for players, though? Are exclusive, OG skins a positive for the Fortnite community, or are they a way for Epic Games to rake-in cash at the expense of their player base? Today, we’re exploring this divisive topic.

This discussion was triggered by the rerelease of the rare Recon Expert skin in the Fortnite Item Shop. It hasn’t been in the normal rotation since it was first released back in 2017. Until now, only the OG Fortnite players had access to this skin.

Take the ‘OG’ element of this skin out of the equation. Look at it objectively. Is it anything special? Is there any reason to purchase this skin other than the (now irrelevant) status symbol of owning it?

Some will say “yes, there is,” and to those people I say: by all means, buy the skin. The reality is, however, that this skin would receive a fraction of the purchases if it was released for the first time in 2020. People are buying it for the ‘OG’ factor, and that’s not a good thing for the Fortnite player base.

We’ve seen this play out several times in Fortnite. The Ghoul and Skull Trooper skins received similar attention when they were rereleased to the Item Shop. Subjectively, these are more interesting skins than the Recon Expert, but their purchases were fueled by the artificial status symbol that came with them – just the same.

Epic threw the true OGs a bone with the aforementioned Trooper skins, giving them exclusive variants that weren’t available to those who recently purchased the items. This doesn’t solve the problem, though. In fact, it creates a new one: account selling.

There will always be a market for video game accounts, whether players are buying alt accounts or ones with a plethora of skins that they missed. By adding ‘OG’ variants to skins, however, Epic are only fueling this black market economy. You can find an account with all of the OG skins on PlayerAuctions for nearly $10,000 USD.

Epic don’t allow players to buy and sell accounts – something that any longtime fans of Tfue will know. Tfue purchased an account with OG skins back in the early days of Fortnite. Epic responded by banning his purchased account and main account, which triggered the Tfault movement that many fans know all too well.

At the same time, Epic are indirectly fueling this economy by keeping certain skins exclusive to those who played during the early days. And we haven’t even mentioned the number of scammers that operate of sites like these.

To be clear, we’re not talking about exclusive Battle Pass cosmetics. These should be exclusive to each season – there’s no arguing that. The argument is that Epic are fueling the account-selling market and raking-in profits every time they rerelease an old skin – all at the expense of, largely, young Fortnite players.

The Renegade Raider is one of the last, true OG skins that hasn’t returned to the Item Shop. You’d be crazy to think that it wasn’t eventually coming back, even if they give the OGs an exclusive variant. It will be an incredibly lucrative Item Shop rotation when Renegade Raider does make her return.

There isn’t much that we can do about this practice, and it’s not the worst thing a video game company has done to make money. To their credit, Epic have handled microtransactions extremely well in Fortnite. This practice is calculated and a bit manipulative, however, and it deserves to be called out.

In the end, our message is this: buy the skins that you want to buy because you like how they look, not because you think they’ll be rare or offer you some sort of artificial status symbol. It can all go away in an instant, as OG Recon Expert owners now know, firsthand.

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