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Ninja to appear on Celebrity Family Feud alongside JuJu Smith-Schuster

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Celebrity Family Feud will be hosting Tyler ‘Ninja’ Blevins’ family against NFL’s JuJu Smith-Schuster’s squad on August 25. Here is everything you need to know about his appearance.

Ninja has had a wild 2019 spanning from helping to cast the Fortnite World Cup to breaking the internet by leaving Twitch for Microsoft’s Mixer.

While his calendar is packed with appearances and events, Fortnite’s biggest star made time to head back to Family Feud.

Promotional pictures were released to help promote the show that was filmed back in February, where Ninja will be showing off his signature blue locks.

The Illinois-native will be appearing alongside his wife and brothers as they battle it out against Pittsburgh Steelers’ JuJu Smith-Schuster’s family.

How do I watch Celebrity Family Feud?

The show will begin at 8 pm ET / 5 pm PT on ABC’s cable channel. For those who do not have access to cable television, they can also watch by using ABC Go’s application and subscribing to the service.

There will be two different rounds of Celebrity Family Feud with Team Ninja vs Team JuJu and Team Flutie vs Team Springer. The second round will be between former NFL quarterback Doug Flutie and Jerry Springer.

This will be Ninja’ second appearance on the Family Feud game show as he was previously a guest back in 2014 where Steve Harvey wasn’t too impressed with the gamer’s career path. After Ninja’s multimillion-dollar success, we think Steve Harvey might feel a different way now.

If you miss the broadcast of Ninja on Celebrity Family Feud, don’t worry, we are sure tons of clips will be posted online after the show!

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Ninja cites aim assist as to why he doesn’t play Fortnite as much

Ninja steps away from Fortnite, citing aim assist on PC as his reasoning.

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The topic of aim assist in Fortnite is one that will, seemingly, never go away. Keyboard and mouse (KBM) players are adamant that Epic nerf or remove aim assist while controller players claim that they need it to compete.

At the highest level, it’s easy to see the problem with aim assist. Professional controller players don’t even need shotguns, in most cases, as long as they have an SMG, Drum Gun, or Scar in their inventory.

The problem is that most controller players aren’t pro players. This group, largely, can’t understand why pro players are complaining about aim assist so frequently. To some of them, it seems like aim assist is hardly there.

Fortnite Mobile Controller Support
Via Epic Games

There are two sides to this story, and both sides have a point. Objectively, Linear and Exponential aim assist are too strong during close-range spray fights. By the same token, certain KBM players seem to blame nearly every death on a controller player, even if the opponent is using a keyboard and mouse.

Ninja has been an outspoken critic of aim assist in Fortnite. He’s always made it clear that he’s talking about using a controller on PC, but his message is the same: aim assist needs to be addressed.

During a recent League of Legends stream, Ninja discussed stream snipers and why he hasn’t been playing Fortnite as much. “I haven’t legitimately played Fortnite in a long time,” he said. “I’m just waiting. Right now, it’s not in a healthy state on PC.”

When pressed on his reasons for leaving Fortnite, Ninja expanded on his answer, “I think Fortnite is doing a great job. I just want that controller aim assist on PC balanced.”

(0:20 for mobile viewers)

“Controller aim assist on 240hz is, like, super broken,” Ninja finished. This is not a new take from Ninja, but it’s the first time that he’s publically stepped away from Fortnite, and cited PC aim assist as his reasoning.

Ninja’s Twitch rival, Tfue, has also expressed his thoughts about moving away from Fortnite. “Aim assist ruined Fortnite for M&K players,” he wrote on Twitter after the FNCS. “Looks like we need to find a new game unlucky.”

The professional Fortnite scene continues to thrive despite the complaints about aim assist. Controller players showed their skills in the NA-East region during the FNCS, but KBM players took home the bulk of the European placement positions.

There’s a huge outcry about aim assist in Fortnite. It would be surprising if Epic didn’t address it, at this point. We could expect to see another change to PC aim assist – or aim assist, in general – before Season 3 releases.

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Fortnite player reveals Tfue’s Llama-spotting secret

Want to spot llamas in Fortnite like Tfue? Here’s how he does it.

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Tfue has been one of the best llama spotters in the game for a long time. His llama-spotting abilities date back to before Chapter 2. He was pinging llamas from the Battle Bus on the old map with the same accuracy that he sees them on the new one.

A lot of Tfue’s viewers wonder how he’s able to identify so many llamas from so far away. Some fans even think the streamer is using an exploit to see the colorful pinatas.

Those who look deeper into Tfue’s eagle-eyed ways know that his colorblind settings play a role. He uses the Duetronope setting, which helps llamas stand out. Nickmercs was stunned when he finally figured this out.

This colorblind setting helps, but those who have tried it, themselves, notice that spotting llamas from hundreds of meters away isn’t as easy as it looks. Reddit user u/TommyTwelkMeyers explained all of the settings you need to use if you want to spot llamas like the master.

As he stated in his post, render distance plays a large role in spotting llamas. “Just like supply drops, Llamas are not limited by Render Distance,” he wrote. “If I’m looking at a hill cross-map, I will not have trees are grass rendered in. It is completely empty and only a pink group of pixels are visible and easy to see.”

Via: u/TommyTwelkMeyers

“Tfue used this same ‘visual exploit’ and it is not visual to us because of down-scaled resolution,” he continued. “The 4 in the back are hard to see seeing that they are only around 3 pixels each but in-game you are easily able to see them due to the contrast.”

The gist is that Tfue is able to see these llamas on his screen, even though they aren’t visible to his audience, most of the time. The trick is to keep your graphics on the lowest setting so fewer visuals render-in and the start of the game. When you combine this with the Duetronope colorblind setting, it makes spotting llamas a whole lot easier.

This may take some practice, but identifying llamas gets easier once you know what to look for. Keep an eye out for those pink and blue dots on your screen. They indicate that there’s a llama in the distance.

Hopefully, this trick helps you secure some llamas and gives you a competitive edge against your opponents. Tfue isn’t the only elite llama spotter in Fortnite.

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Ninja and SypherPK push for Fortnite player count increase

SypherPK, Ninja, and CourageJD discuss the idea of adding more players to each Fortnite match.

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Fortnite is a game that has been largely driven by player feedback. Despite their shortcomings in some areas, Epic has been reacting to player suggestions since Fortnite’s inception. The last patch, v12.50, was a perfect example of this. Epic revived patch notes, nerfed the Heavy Sniper, and tried to address aim assist on PC – all changes that were requested by the community.

The Reboot Van was another fan-requested feature that Epic added to Fortnite after the successful release of Apex Legends. They weren’t the only game to borrow the idea of reviving teammates, but they showed that they were open to good ideas when they came.

Epic Games

Recently, SypherPK, Ninja, and CourageJD discussed the idea of increasing the player count from 100 to 125 or 150 – similar to what Warzone has done. The idea of increasing the player count has been floating around since Season 2 began but picked up steam when Call of Duty: Warzone came out.

“I’m thinking, how can Fortnite match the intensity of a match like Warzone does with the amount of players and the amount of action that’s always available on the map?” Sypher prompted the group.

“This map is 40% bigger than the last map and has the same amount of players,” Ninja pointed out. “It’s flawed.” Courage then suggested that Fortnite increase its player count to 150, to which Ninja agreed – even with a middle ground of 125.

On the topic of lag, Sypher and Ninja agreed that the issue wouldn’t affect public matches. Competitive matches already have more players than the server can handle, but public matches often go off without a hitch.

“I’m sure the pub servers can handle 125 – even 150 [players],” Sypher suggested. Having ten or fifteen more players in a late-game scenario is far from too many.

After Epic removed skill-based matchmaking from squads, the lobbies started to thin-out surprisingly quickly. Good players found the bad players and bots – eliminating them and leaving about 20 people left by the time the first circle closed.

It’s no secret that a lot of Fortnite games show a massive lull in engagement towards the middle of each match. A higher player count could help spice things up.

It seems like most players would agree with this idea – as long as the increased player count doesn’t affect performance. Something like this probably wouldn’t come to Fortnite until Season 3, however, so we’ll have to wait and see what Epic decide.

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