The B.R.U.T.E. mech’s addition to Fortnite is hard to explain away, but Nickmercs has the best reasoning for Epic’s idea we’ve heard so far.

Epic Games decided to add the BRUTE mech to Fortnite with Season X and we’ve been scratching our heads trying figure out why. It’s extremely overpowered with easy to use mechanics and a health pool the size of Jupiter. What could possibly explain why they would add something so unbalanced?

FaZe Clan’s Nickmercs went ahead and took a crack at that question recently. His explanation certainly makes sense considering the seemingly conflicting forces of casual & competitive within Epic.

Nickmercs on why Epic added the BRUTE mech

Nickmercs, the most watched Fortnite controller player, was trying to figure out why the B.R.U.T.E. was a thing in existence. The mech shocked him and other pros as it doesn’t fit properly into any aspect of the BR experience.

After chatting it up with his stream, he came to a conclusion that we partially agree with. Creative imagination paired with the power to influence millions of players can be a dangerous combo when thinking about proper game balancing.

Love him or hate him, he spittin facts from r/FortNiteBR

Epic Games has stated, on several occasions, that they do not want to separate the casual & competitive loot pools. This means that all items and vehicles must be made to fit both arenas. This is a nearly impossible task as Fortnite is, at its core, a casual experience for millions of players. The best example of this system failing was the Storm Flip which was banned from two qualifiers and the FWC Finals.

As Nickmercs says, now that the Fortnite World Cup is over, Epic can implement anything they want into the game without paying attention to competitive balance. “Do you think because the World Cup is over, they just snapped and said **** it?” is how Nick envisioned the internal meeting.

We don’t think it was as blatant a decision as this, but of course the mood within the studio could’ve gotten more lax. With that said, Epic should realize that competitive gameplay doesn’t mean ‘anti-fun’, but rather means ‘fair.’ Casual players want a fair experience just as much as the competitive all-star.

Hopefully, Nickmercs’ prediction for the rest of Season X doesn’t come true. When talking about Epic’s “bag” of declined ideas, the pro stated “I feel like this season they’re just gonna dump the bag on us.”

To the casual player who doesn’t care about competitive, we implore you to see the benefits of having a competitive focused design team. Fun gameplay is rooted in the equal ability of two (or more) players to eliminate each other. The B.R.U.T.E. is the ultimate in unfairness as it gives the driver/gunner an immense and overwhelming advantage.

Epic Games’ issues statement on B.R.U.T.E. nerfs

Balance should come before all else in our humble opinion

Maybe our trust in Epic is a bit stronger than Nick’s, but we don’t believe they will completely throw the game into a state of disarray. Still, Epic’s latest statement about the B.R.U.T.E. mech nerfs isn’t exactly encouraging news.

In a quick Reddit post, the developers simply stated that they would be “evaluating” the mech’s power in the coming days.

The statement drew a great deal of anger from the community since Epic has access to millions of hours of gameplay where the B.R.U.T.E. is running rampant. The lack of immediate action reinforces Nickmercs’ point that Epic is simply to looking to “have fun” with the design process rather caring about balance.

We hope Epic will be more tame with their releases throughout the season. A great way to add ‘crazy’ ideas would be to have them present in LTMs or even semi-permanent modes. Some players were outraged by the no-building zone of Tilted Town which could’ve also been pushed into a separate mode.

Do you think Nickmercs’ dire prediction of Season X will come true in the coming weeks? Give us your thoughts on the subject in the comments below.

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A life-long Call of Duty player, Bachelor of Game Design, and a lover of all things eSports. Born in Finland, living in the States. To me, video games aren't a part of life. Rather, life's just another part of video games.