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Fortnite World Cup Solos Week 1 Recap

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Fortnite World Cup

The first week of the Fortnite World Cup qualifiers is behind us and there’s a lot of important info to talk about. Let’s recap the events of the weekend.

The Fortnite World Cup has been getting hyped for quite some time by Epic Games and it finally began its qualifiers this past weekend. Though Epic Games has promised premium grade quality, the weekend was definitely not without its hitches.

Diving in at the deep end, let’s take a look at the players that made it through the weekend and qualified from each Region.

Players Who Qualified during Week 1 of the FWC

Epic Games has released the official list of the competitors from the week 1 Fortnite World Cup qualifiers. The event was a Solos competition, Duos will begin on Saturday, April 20th.

Epic put out an tweet to congratulate the players on their job well done.

Here’s the full list of players that qualified for the Fortnite World Cup Finals from Week 1:

Oceania

  • Oceania – Slaya

Asia

  • Asia – Top_Faxfox

Europe

  • E11 Stompy
  • TQ Prison3bro
  • NRG Benjyfish
  • Hreds Belaeu
  • Gambit.Letw1k3
  • LDLC Nayte
  • S2V DiegoGB
  • Trainh DRG

Brazil

  • Quasar Leleo

NA East

  • Sen Bugha
  • Dubs FN
  • Ghost Bizzle
  • TSM_Comadon
  • Liquid Vivid
  • 100T Ceice
  • Snow XD
  • Bloom Riversan

Players from each region qualified according to their region’s leaderboard for the event. The chart below shows the breakdown of spots available per region for Solos.

Solos FWC Qualification Spots

Leaderboard Bugs, Stream Crashes Plagued Week 1

While Epic Games has been adamant to promise a smooth, competitive experience, the trend of their shortcomings in recent months continued.

As the event got underway, bugs began to the plague the pressured Event system of Fortnite. The leaderboards, which players used to track their progress against other players, became glitched for a sub-set of competitors.

Fortnite World Cup
Week 1 of the Fortnite World Cup wasn’t the smoothest eSports we’ve seen

The leaderboards showed that some players were not receiving any points for matches. Epic Games quickly stated that the issue was only a visual bug, but this could have delayed many players from playing their matches/performing at their best.

In addition, game performance was stretched to its limits (thought next weekend’s Duos event will stretch it even more). Some players still reported poor stability of the game client, but overall, Epic seems to have managed to make large end-games playable on the PC.

Console players have all been essentially pushed out of the competitive scene as large scale end-game simply run too poorly. Most, if not all, controller players now actively play the game on PC.

Another problem that cropped up had to with Epic’s official stream. The broadcast went down several time during the weekend’s events. While we enjoy watching the game as an eSport, the production value seems to be lacking.

Epic has released the replays of the event for all players to view in-game along with directions on how to get the replay files working.

Fortnite World Cup – Online Open Week 1: Replays Available from r/FortniteCompetitive

When compared to other eSports, Epic has nailed the visual aspect of their studio, but the viewing format of player stream switching and some active gameplay is wonky at best. We hope to see Epic evolve this as the event progresses.

So, the event was a mixed bag, but an overall success for Epic Games and many players. Epic still has a lot to work on and we’re sure they’ll cover their bases in due time.

Epic Games

Will Fortnite be banned in the US after Tencent investigation?

Epic Games has received a letter from the Committee on Foreign Investment involving their investor, Tencent. What does this mean for Fortnite?

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News has been swirling about the potential ban of TikTok in the United States, recently. Banning the biggest app in the world not only has implications for the millions of users but also for other companies that have attracted similar scrutiny from the US government. That ban has recently been put on hold, but it still could be coming later this week.

Namely, the Chinese technology company, Tencent, is under investigation by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. Tencent is one of the largest gaming companies in the world and boasts ownership of Riot Games and a 40% stake in Epic Games.

Epic Games

A recent report from Bloomberg stated that Epic and Riot – among other companies – have received letters requesting them to turn over information about their security protocols, including how they handle the personal data of their US-based customers.

Epic Games is an American Company, but Tencent has a large stake in them. Epic may have access to the personal data of their customers, and the US government is concerned about what they’re doing with it. In China, companies and the government aren’t as separated as they are in the US and other countries.

So, what does this mean for Fortnite? Well, it’s too soon to be 100% sure. We’ve seen some outlets waffling over whether or not Fortnite will face a ban, similar to what we’re seeing with TikTok. We’re no experts, but we don’t see this happening.

Tencent has a minority stake in Fortnite. At most, we expect them to be forced to sell their stake in the developer and move on. It might be more tricky with companies like Riot Games, where Tencent owns a controlling stake. Fortnite, however, should be safe.

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Avery, Arkham & Skqttles win Ninja Battles 4: full results

The last-minute trio of Skqttles, Arkham, Avery win Ninja Battles 4.

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Ninja returned, exclusively, to Twitch and brought Ninja Battles with him. The six-week Trios Fortnite tournament series faced delay after delay, resulting in Week 4 taking place two seasons after Week 1. Funny enough, Ninja Battles has now spanned three seasons of Fortnite.

The tournament was entertaining, as usual, and continues to make the case for smaller-scale Fortnite tournaments – especially in a world where chest spawn rates are under 100%.

Ninja joined BallaTW and MonsterDFace on the broadcast this time around – another sign that he’s back into the Fortnite world. He might not be able to compete with this level of Fortnite player – there are only one or two “content creators” in the tournament – but he still has hundreds of hours of experience to draw from when discussing the game.

When it was all said and done, the trio of Avery, Arkham, and Skqttles won the competition with 65 points – only six points above Commandment, Cented, and Edgey. Bucke, Kreo, and Stretch came in third with 56 points. Interestingly, the second and third-place trios each won two of the five games in the tournament.

As we learned in the postgame interview, the winning trio was patched together at the last minute – even bringing in Arkham from NA-West, who tweeted that he won the tournament on 80 Ping.

Here’s a look at the rest of the standings outside of the top five:

6. Zyfa, Nosh, Clix
7. Megga, Bizzle, Dubs
8. Scoped, Ceice, Blake
9. Jayth, Crunchy, Whofishy
10. YungCalc, Mackwood, ZexRow
11. UnknownxArmy, Zayt, Saf
12. Coop, Ajerss, Haz
13. Av, Shark, Knight
14. Nate Hill, Funk, Tragix
15. Aspect, Npen, Xoonies
16. NickEh30, Punisher, Replays
17. Bugha, Chap, Jamper
18. EmadGG, Slackes, Acorn
19. MrSavage, LeTsHe, benjyfishy
20. JaredFPS, Tilt, Thiefs

One of the biggest surprises in the tournament was the established trio of Chap, Bugha, and Jamper only walking away with 17th place, behind NickEh30’s trio that started the tournament with two back-to-back 0-point games. The latter team took two early-game fights with Scoped & crew before wisely backing off and changing their drop spot.

Although MrSavage and the EU boys placed in 19th, they had one impressive off-ping squad-wipe of Unknown, Saf, and Zayt in Doom’s Domain.

Ninja Battles continues to be, in our opinion, the most entertaining version of competitive Fortnite. Epic appear to be married to the 100-player Battle Royale format, but 60 players feels like the perfect spot for this game. It’s easier to follow the storylines, keep track of all of the action, and more than anything, it drastically improves the performance of the game.

With any luck, Ninja Battles 5 will avoid delays and take place next week. Whenever the next Fortnite tournament takes place, we’ll be covering it here and live-tweeting it over on @FortniteINTEL, so follow us there.

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DreamHack Open ft. Fortnite September results

Alliege, Marz, and Teeq take home first place in each region for the DreamHack Open Fortnite September tournament.

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The DreamHack Open September Fortnite tournament is in the books with Alliege, Marz, and Teeq taking home the victory in each region. The NA-East and EU stages of the competition took place over the weekend with NA-West wrapping-up on the 13th.

The tournament saw some rising stars along with some returning champions place at the top of the heap. Here’s a look at the full results for each region.

NA-West DreamHack Open results

The NA-West region was the first to finish the DreamHack September tournament on the 13th. After several qualifications and lackluster placements, Alliege put it all together and won the tournament. He was followed by 5G Nach and one of the most dominant players in the region, Arkham.

Several NA-East players went off-ping to place highly on NA-West. Dubs came in at 8 and Jamper placed 11 – padding his purse for the event. Other noteworthy finishes include Cented at 6, Lanjok at 9, and Whofishy at 12.

Stats via: FortniteTracker

NA-East DreamHack Open results

A rising star in the Fortnite scene, Marzz_OW, took home first place in the NA-East region with 293 points. The win was a long time coming for Marz, who has been grinding competitive Fortnite since the early days. It’s good to see him take the win.

Behind Marz was, unsurprisingly, Bugha. Bugha remains one of the best solo Fortnite players in any region – continuing to prove himself tournament after tournament. A portion of the competitive Fortnite fanbase likes to pretend that Bugha is “washed,” but the pro constantly proves that his World Cup win was anything but a fluke.

Other noteworthy finished include MackWood at 7, Jamper at 8, Slackes at 11, Zexrow at 17, Unknown at 21, and Bizzle at 22.

Stats via: FortniteTracker

European DreamHack Open results

Teeq proves that he’s one of the most dominant Fortnite players in EU with yet another DreamHack Open win. He took home the DreamHack July competition as well and adds a September victory to his portfolio.

Znappy and Verox had identical statistics in second and third place, but Znappy won the tiebreaker. Some noteworthy players who finished outside of the top 15 include Th0masHD at 17 and BenjyFishy at 18.

Stats via: FortniteTracker

Next up for competitive Fortnite will be the FNCS Trios, which should begin within the next couple of weeks. After that will be another DreamHack Solo tournament in October.

In the meantime, competitive Fortnite fans can wet their appetite with Ninja Battles, region-locked Cash Cups, and daily pro scrimmages streamed on Twitch.

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