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Fortnite FNCS Invitational Week 2 recap

The FNCS Invitational Week 2 qualification round is in the books. Take a look at who’s in and who will be competing in the Reboot Round.

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The FNCS Invitational Week 2 concluded this weekend, with some new faces popping up in the biggest regions in Fortnite. Next week, we’ll have a stacked Reboot Round while some of the most recognizable Fortnite pros try to secure their spot in the FNCS Solo Grand Finals.

Here’s a recap of the top twenty and some notable qualifiers in each region. All placements, points, kills, and more were compiled by @KinchAnalytics on Twitter.

FNCS Invitational EU results

The European region has proven to be the most predictable of them all, with names like MrSavage, Mongraal, BenjyFishy, Wolfies, and LeTsHe in the top 20. BenjyFishy took home back-to-back FNCS weeks, making him the clear favorite going into the grand finals.

Other noteworthy players who qualified outside of the top 20 include Crr, Aqua, and Idrop, among many others.

BenjyFishy the clear favorite going into Grand Finals

FNCS Invitational NAE results

The NA-East region received the biggest shake-up of all, with several high-profile names getting left off of the qualification list. Many consider this region to be the most “stacked” in all of Fortnite, and that may include some names that we haven’t heard before.

Consistent performers like Mackwood, Funk, Innocents, Clix, Ceice, and many more failed to qualify for the Grand Finals in Week 2. This will be the region to watch during the Reboot Round, next weekend.

Outside of the top 20, some notable qualifiers include Av, Khanada, Zayt, Bizzle, Megga, Cizlucky, Arab, Assault, and Avery.

Tuexy bounces back from a 174 finish in Week 1 to first in Week 2

FNCS Invitational NAW results

Controller players showed up in the NA-West region, taking first and second place. EpikWhalerr has been one of the only notable KBM players to make the full-time switch to the controller. He placed first, ahead of fellow controller player WavyJacob.

Controller dominates the FNCS NA-West qualifiers

FNCS Invitational OCE results

FNCS Invitational ME results

FNCS Invitational ASIA results

FNCS Invitational BR results

Esports

Longtime NRG pro Zayt retires from competitive Fortnite

One of the original players in the competitive Fortnite community, Williams ‘Zayt’ Aubin, has announced his retirement from the game.

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One of the original competitive Fortnite greats, Zayt, has announced his retirement from competitive Fortnite.

In a landscape where Fortnite pros are outspoken about the dwindling tournament prize pools and lack of incentive to “grind” Fortnite, one of the most iconic pro player in the scene, Williams “Zayt” Aubin, has announced his retirement from competitive Fortnite.

“Before you guys freak out, I’m not leaving NRG, I’m staying in the Fortnite scene,” Zayt told his fans. “But … I’m gonna stop competing in Fortnite. I’m gonna stop playing tournaments, I’m gonna stop playing scrims.”

Zayt went on to say that he’ll be using his Fortnite knowledge to coach other players and analyze professional gameplay. He even used the phrase, “content creator,” which he has seemed to avoid in the past.

Zayt is one of the only players who has stuck with competitive Fortnite since the early days. He and Saf were one of the only Duos to make it through the World Cup era and remain together through all of the FNCS tournaments.

Saf commemorated the departure of his longtime duo partner with a collage on Twitter. “Gonna miss you, this one hits hard,” he wrote. “Thanks for everything. Love u bro @zayt.”

World Cup champion, Bugha, gave his thoughts on Zayt’s departure as well. The former related Zayt’s retirement to the current state of competitive Fortnite. Zayt retweeted the post, suggesting that he may agree with the sentiment.

“Seeing one of the best fortnite players quit the game is pretty weird,” Bugha wrote. “If changes aren’t made soon many others will most likely follow down the same path. Best of luck to your future @zayt.”

While we’re disappointed to see a monolith of competitive Fortnite leave the game, he isn’t leaving the scene. We’re excited to see what’s next for Zayt and which up-and-coming pros he’ll help lead to victory.

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How to compete in the $250,000 DreamHack Open January competition

Fortnite competitive is kicking off 2021 with the return of the $250,000 DreamHack Open Fortnite tournament series.

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The DreamHack Open Fortnite tournament series is returning for 2021, with the first event kicking off in January.

A new year means a new Fortnite competition to begin 2021. The DreamHack Open ft. Fortnite returns for January with another $250,000 up for grabs.

Sign-ups for the DreamHack Open begin this Wednesday, January 13. Here’s everything you need to know to compete in or watch the first competitive Fortnite event of 2021.

DreamHack January tournament details

Late last year, DreamHack switched their standard Fortnite tournament format from Solos to Duos, which most players and fans tend to prefer.

Like all of the DreamHack Fortnite events, the tournament will begin with open qualifiers, with 250 teams from each heat moving onto the semifinals. 50 duo teams then advance to the Grand Finals.

Point System

The DreamHack point system has become one of the favorites among Fortnite pros. These are high-scoring affairs, which means the point system rewards the most consistent performers

  • 1st – 55
  • 2nd – 49
  • 3rd – 46
  • 4th – 43
  • 5th – 40
  • 25th – 2
  • Eliminations – 5 points each

Schedule

Unlike past tournaments, the three regions (NA-West, East, and EU) will all compete the same week. Here are the dates and times for each region of the January DreamHack Open event:

NA-West (PST)

Heat #1
Fri, Jan 22, 6PM-9PM

Heat #2
Sat, Jan 30, 2PM-5PM

Semi-finals
Sat, Jan 30, 6PM-9PM

Grand finals
Sun, Jan 31, 2PM-8PM

NA-East (EST)

Heat #1
Fri Jan 22, 6PM-9PM

Heat #2
Sat Jan 23, 2PM-5PM

Semi-finals
Sat Jan 23, 6PM-9PM

Grand finals
Sun Jan 24, 2PM-8PM

Europe (CET)

Heat #1
Fri Jan 22, 6PM-9PM

Heat #2
Sat Jan 23, 2PM-5PM

Semi-finals
Sat Jan 23, 6PM-9PM

Grand finals
Sun Jan 24, 2PM-8PM

You can watch all of the action play out on the official DreamHack Fortnite Twitch channel, or watch the POV of any of the competitors.

This is sure to be another great Fortnite competition to kick-off 2021. We’ll keep you posted with any additional news.

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Benjyfishy, Nate Hill & more Fortnite pros speak out about dwindling prize pools

Fortnite pros like Nate Hill, Wolfiez, and Benjyfishy are speaking out about the low prize pools offered in Season 5.

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Prize pools in competitive Fortnite are once again under fire from the pro community, who has seen them substantially decrease over the course of the last few seasons.

Epic Games recently announced the competitive schedule for Season 5, including the FNCS, Cash Cups, LTM competitions, and new Bragging Rights tournaments.

While the larger competitive Fortnite community was happy to see so many events in Season 5, the pro players quickly noticed the dwindling prize pool for paid events.

Epic lowering the prize pool of major Fortnite tournaments has been a topic of discussion for a few seasons. Pro players noticed that older tournaments contained drastically more money than those in the present day.

There are a few theoretical reasons for this shift. Competitive Fortnite may be past its peak regarding viewership and Epic are splitting prize pools across multiple platforms.

This didn’t stop pro players from voicing their concerns. NRG pro, Benjyfishy, even suggested that the competitive Fortnite scene could dry-up without high-paid tournaments.

Looking back at my old vids n s**t actually makes me sad like I miss daily cups I miss actually just wanting to grind the game 24/7 cause I genuinely enjoyed it and there was a good incentive to do it,” Benjyfishy wrote on Twitter.

Benjyfishy wasn’t the only pro to criticize Epic Games’ lack of recent attention to competitive Fortnite. Wolfiez made a joke about the Bragging Rights tournaments, comparing the “shoutout” prize to the millions of dollars up for grabs in 2019 and 2020.

Nate Hill even @ed the Fortnite Twitter account, suggesting that if they crowd-funded “a small % from every battle pass to the Prize pool, we could have real tourneys that people are interested in watching. No one cares who got first place in a vBucks tourney. Dota 2 – 34million. Fortnite – box of cupcakes.”

Competitive Fortnite still has strong viewership, with tier-one organizations continuing to sign Fortnite players. There’s no arguing with the statistics, though, Fortnite’s prize pools have gone down since 2019.

It’s too early to tell if 2021 will offer the least amount of money yet, but Season 5 doesn’t look like a great start for Fortnite pros. Until we have an official statement from Epic on the matter, pro players and fans will continue to speculate.

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