Connect with us

Esports

Cloak says he’ll reveal ‘everything’ about his time with FaZe Clan in furious tweetstorm

Published

on

Cloakzy, much like Tfue, is currently in the middle of a dirty divorce from FaZe Clan. The Fortnite superstar furiously took to Twitter on June 23rd to threaten to reveal every detail of his mistreatment.

Tfue’s exit from FaZe Clan wasn’t pretty and involved a lot of drama. Now, Cloakzy is having a similar time of leaving the organization. After revealing some of his contract details, Cloak is now threatening to reveal ‘everything.’

In a Sunday Twitter tirade, the pro seems to have had enough of FaZe Clan’s alleged garbage. Monday, June 24th may turn out to be an exciting day for Fortnite esports fans.

The Cloak vs. FaZe Clan Situation So Far

Tfue and Cloak say goodbye to FaZe Clan’s underhand contracts – via Cloak

Before we get into the latest tweets, let’s go through some contextual information. On his stream, Cloak explained some of his frustrations with FaZe Clan and how he has been trying to leave the org.

“I don’t wanna be transferred, so I don’t know why they put that in there,” he said. “I’ve been trying to leave for the past six months before the whole Tfue thing came out. I just went with the more passive route. I with with the route of ‘Listen, I’m willing to work this out.”

According to Cloak, he has been trying to leave FaZe Clan through calm and calculated means. He doesn’t want to a hothead, but now the org has forced the player’s hand. As soon as the confirmation of Cloak’s failure to qualify for the World Cup was official, FaZe Clan declared it was open to let the man go.

Though, as the clip and statement above show, they did not “waste” time in telling Cloak.

“They didn’t come to me before posting a TwitLonger, so it seems like now they are in agreement in letting me go because now I didn’t qualify for the World Cup it seems like,” Cloak said while streaming to thousands.

Cloakzy threatens to drop bombshell info about FaZe

FaZe Clan’s failed sleigh-of-hand tactics have now riled Cloak up. In adverse to his usually calm style of negotiation, he now threatening to reveal ‘everything.’

With everything that has been hitting FaZe, the organization’s chiefs could be in a panic. Tfue’s original contract was an abysmal display of player recruitment and Cloak’s experience could be even worse.

The Tfue lawsuit is still on-going and the ex-FaZe pro has been careful to keep his lips sealed. If Cloak has no intention of suing FaZe Clan, he might well reveal damaging information about the org’s dealings with players, internal struggles, and more.

Cloak also called FaZe Clan and any other company looking to set up a transfer proposal ‘thick-headed.’ Strong words that suggest the player will not be looking to join another org any time soon.

We’ll keep you updated as the story continues to unfold. You can expect at least a few juicy details from Cloak’s stream in the coming days.

Battle Royale

Fortnite Champion Series Chapter 3 Season 3 start date and prize pool revealed 

Fortnite has announced the Champion Series (FNCS) for Chapter 3 Season 3 in which pros worldwide will compete for 3 million dollars.

Published

on

FNCS Chapter 3 Season 3

The Fortnite Champion Series is easily the most anticipated competitive event every season. In Chapter 3 Season 3, the likes of Bugha, Clix, and Arkhram, among others, will battle it out for a prize pool of 3 million dollars.

Epic Games has finally announced the FNCS for Chapter 3 Season 3. This time around, the logo seems to have a tropical theme that matches the ‘Vibin’ season. The meta has also changed significantly, and it will be interesting to see how some of the most talented esports athletes have adapted to it.

Everything to know about Fortnite Champion Series (FNCS) Chapter 3 Season 3

Fortnite Champion Series for Chapter 3 Season 3 will begin on July 6 with 3 Qualifier rounds. The top five teams (Duos) from each round will directly advance to the FNCS Finals.

The qualifiers will take place till July 18 and the Semi-Finals will begin on July 21. As per Epic Games, the key to reaching the finals is Victory Royales and consistency. In the three Semi-Finals sessions, 6 Victory Royale winners and the top six consistent teams will move ahead.

The Finals will take place between August 12-14. There are two ways for a team to win the Fortnite Champion Series in Chapter 3 Season 3:

  • The first team to get three Victory Royales and earn 475 points will be declared the FNCS champion. This is called the Match Point.
  • If no team is able to acquire a Match Point at the end of 12 Finals matches, the duo with the highest points will win.

Chapter 3 Season 3 FNCS prize pool distribution

The prize pool for the Chapter 3 Season 3 FNCS is a whopping $3 million. However, it will be divided across several regions:

  • EU: $1,350,000
  • NAE: $690,000
  • BR: $240,000
  • NAW: $240,000
  • ASIA: $240,000
  • ME: $120,000
  • OCE: $120,000

The prize pool is different for each region, primarily because of Fortnite’s prominence there. It is evident that the viewership numbers in Europe are much higher than in the Middle East and Oceania.

FNCS Chapter 3 Season 2 rewards
Fortnite Champion Series in Chapter 3 Season 2 granted these rewards to viewers

It is worth noting that fans should be able to unlock some free cosmetics by watching the matches. New FNCS-themed cosmetics also arrive in the Item Shop.

All in all, it is safe to assume that the Fortnite Champion Series for Chapter 3 Season 3 will be more exciting than ever. A ton of new features and weapons have arrived recently, and even map changes have been quite frequent.

Continue Reading

Battle Royale

Fortnite star SypherPK quits Zero Build tournament after losing to cheaters

The Zero Build tournaments in Fortnite have been hijacked by cheaters, and streamer SypherPK eagerly wants Epic Games to fix it.

Published

on

Fortnite veteran SypherPK has always been vocal about cheaters and stream snipers in the community. The streamer’s latest encounter with hackers in a Zero Build tournament compelled him to quit.

Multiplayer games, especially Battle Royales, have always had trouble with cheaters. Brilliant titles like Apex Legends and Call of Duty Warzone became unplayable owing to the rise of hackers and have lost innumerable players so far.

From the looks of it, there has been a surge of hackers in Fortnite Chapter 3 Season 3 as well following the introduction of Zero Build mode.

Fortnite pros are encountering more hackers than ever in Zero Build tournaments

Fortnite caught a second wind with Zero Build as a ton of new players joined the community. Moreover, big names like Ninja, Dr. Disrespect, and Tfue returned to the game and appreciated the non-sweaty mode.

The developers then hosted Zero Build tournaments that received an overwhelmingly positive response initially. However, hackers have now plagued such tournaments.

Fortnite Zero Build mode artwork
Fortnite players can only rely on their aim, game sense, and movement in Zero Build

SypherPK recently took part in the NA West Zero Build finals and he was well aware of the fact that some teams are abusing aim bot and wall hacks.

Soon after, the streamer reported that hackers eliminated him in the very first game. It is no surprise that this incident led to him quitting the cup. He asked Epic Games to work on a live bans feature or atleast a new anti-cheat system that is dedicated to competitive playlists.

Zero Build mode in Fortnite has helped in exposing cheaters

Previously, Fortnite compelled players to build which significantly increased the skill gap between newcomers and veterans. On one side, there were players with the skill set to make a skyscraper within 30 seconds. On the other end of the spectrum, there were beginners who struggled in every game because the SBMM system rarely matched them with equally skilled/experienced players.

Amidst such issues, we are witnessing the growing use of cheats and devices like the Cronus Zen. This allows cheaters to win more comfortably than ever, but naturally, at the cost of the ruined experience of every player they face.

Until Chapter 3 Season 1, it was harder to track cheaters because mechanics like building and editing were an integral part of the meta.

In contrast, aim and mobility are the deciding factors of a Zero Build game. Accordingly, players can now easily identify cheaters using aim bots and wall hacks.

Countless other players, streamers, and pros have similar opinions on the current state of Fortnite and Epic Games would certainly want to come up with a solution before the Cash Cups commence in Chapter 3 Season 3.

Continue Reading

Esports

Fortnite’s Esports revenue explains why there hasn’t been another World Cup

Epic Games overestimated how much money Fortnite Esports would make which could explain why there hasn’t been a second World Cup.

Published

on

Fortnite world cup promo art

Epic Games overestimated how much revenue Fortnite would make from Esports in 2019 by $154 million. This miscalculation could explain why there has only been one Fortnite World Cup.

In 2019, Epic Games dove headfirst into Fortnite’s competitive Esports scene. Following a $100 million prize pool for the year 2018, Epic put up another $100 million in 2019. This insane amount of prize money dwarfed other competitive games in comparison.

2019 was also the year of Fortnite’s first-ever World Cup. The Fortnite World Cup took place from July 26 – 28 in New York City and boasted $30 million in total prizes. One hundred of the best solo players from around the world, and 50 duo teams, competed for a massive amount of money.

Epic Games falls short of revenue goals

While the amount of money up for grabs seems quite impressive, it didn’t net Epic Games with the desired results. During the trial of Epic Games vs Apple, documents were shared that outlined the revenues that Fortnite generated from 2018 to 2019. Epic Games planned to make $4.59 billion during the 2018-2019 fiscal year but actually earned $4.2 billion instead.

The documents stated that Epic Games had anticipated making $154 million more from Fortnite’s Esports scene than it was actually able to generate. While Epic Games is raking in billions of dollars a year, it’s unlikely that it will pour money into something that isn’t as profitable.

This major discrepancy in earnings could explain why there hasn’t been another Fortnite World Cup. After $100 million was awarded in 2019, 2020 saw a massive dip in prize money. The pool for the entire year was only $17 million.

Epic Games stated at the beginning of this year that it would be pledging $20 million in prize money for Fortnite’s 2021 competitive scene. This is $10 million less than the total prize pool for the Fortnite World Cup. Epic also stated that it had no plans for an in-person World Cup event this year.

The lack of prize money has been apparent over the past year as competitive Fortnite players have taken to social media to express their concerns. In 2019, the FNCS qualifier prize pool was $1 million a week for three months. Now, players are competing for a $3 million prize pool over the course of an entire season of FNCS.

The Fortnite World Cup may return in some capacity, but players shouldn’t expect a massive $30 million prize pool. The worldwide pandemic could be to blame for the lack of in-person tournaments, but that doesn’t mean it’s the sole reason there haven’t been any. Epic Games might be focusing on the more profitable aspects of Fortnite to endure the game’s longevity.

Continue Reading