Connect with us

Esports

Allegations suggest many players are cheating in Fortnite tournaments

One pro Fortnite player has been accused of cheating in several Fortnite tournaments. This accusation suggests that several players could placing in tournaments on the back of hacks.

Published

on

Another day, another cheating allegation at high levels of competitive Fortnite. Early on the morning of July 31, Fortnite player Zykoma accused his former trio teammate, Bman, of cheating in Daily Cash Cups and the Bugha Cup. Attached to the accusation was a compilation of clips that appeared to show Bman tracking and locating players who should have been invisible to him.

“So yesterday, @BuckteeFN (part of my trio) found that our third member, @bmanFN, was secretly using hacks without our knowledge,” Zykoma wrote in his tweet. “During daily trio cups AND bugha cup. I’m posting this to show how easily these hacks are accessible and can go multiple tournaments undetected.”

In addition to the first compilation of clips, Zykoma tweeted some screenshots of alleged Discord DMs from Bman, appearing to show the latter admitting to cheating during the Daily Cash Cup, at least.

In the conversation, Bman says things like “I messed up in a daily and now I’m getting canceled” and “This isn’t gonna do s**t. Pros hide it perfectly fine.”

Although Bman is alleged to have admitted to cheating privately, he’s maintained his innocence to the public. He even took to Twitch to host a VoD review of a few of his Bugha Cup matches. The stream lasted all of 11 minutes (of a 4-hour tournament) and his Twitch chat was, predictably, very toxic.

During the short stream, Bman seemed to inadvertently confirm the legitimacy of the Discord DMs. When asked to explain the messages, he told his viewers, “I said I regret s**t. I regret s**t all the time. I’ve switched trios so many f***ing times, it’s insane. Like, I just wish I could stick with one f***ing trio. But then I get ratted out for something I didn’t do, but okay.”

This situation isn’t about one player potentially cheating in a Fortnite tournament, however, it’s about the prevalence of this issue. Several top-tier pros have talked about up-and-comers using soft aim hacks in tournaments. We covered Cented’s tweet, yesterday, which called for Epic to investigate and ban some of these players.

We also spoke with pro player Jonathan ‘Yung Calc’ Weber, who echoed the popular sentiment within the professional community. “A lot of people are just randomly placing now and their aim is way too good,” he told us, “so a lot of pros think people are cheating.”

Reverse2k added to the chorus of voices calling on Epic to intervene when it comes to cheating in tournaments – players who are either using hacks or teaming. “I feel like players only get punishment when random people go into replays and watch their gameplay,” he wrote. “Like where is the anti-cheat?”

We reached out to both Bman and Epic Games for comment on this topic, and neither has responded at the time of writing. We expect to hear something on this from Epic at some point.

There’s a substantial issue with cheaters getting through the anti-cheat, and remaining silent would likely be a green light for cheaters to keep competing in tournaments. It’s undoubtedly on their radar, though, and they may be handling it internally, for now. We’ll keep you updated as this story develops.

Update 7/31 12:56 pm EST

Bman responded to our request for comment just after the article went live. He told us this:

“All I can say is that this is the exact same situation with Dubs, I am not cheating and I will stick by that. I have been building my rep and my skill since World Cup and have been playing fair ever since then. I just want everyone to know I wouldn’t cheat in a tournament and ruin someone else’s chances at making money because some people need it more than others.”

We asked about the DMs that appeared to show his admission of doing something wrong. He told us, “The DMs show how I played poorly during the Daily Cup when I said I regret something and the one with the crossed-out names isn’t real.” This statement is referring to the image we embedded earlier in the article, suggesting that the screenshot directly above is legitimate.

When pressed further, Bman told us, “That was me saying they can drop me if they want. I was playing very very bad that day.” We asked what his teammates would be exposing him for. He did not respond to that question and blocked our account. His Twitter has since been deactivated.

Item Shop

Fortnite reveals first look at Ant-Man skin coming soon

Published

on

Fortnite Ant-Man skin teaser

Epic Games have revealed the first look at what’s expected to be an upcoming Ant-Man skin in Fortnite, but you’ll have to be looking closely at their teasers to spot him.

The Fortnite developers are continuing their relentless spree of crossovers, especially with superhero skins, and it looks like we’re getting another one very soon.

This time around, it’s the tiny Ant-Man. On March 6, Epic Games tweeted an image Domino, Cable, and Psylocke, but look closer, and you’ll spot someone else there too.

Sitting on Cable’s arm, we can make out the tiny hero.

And that’s not the only teaser for Ant-Man. In a second image, we can see him standing on the tip of the sword.

We’d assume that Ant-Man will actually be the regular character model size when the skin is playable in game – or else it would be the most powerful skin around (although not sure how he’d hold any weapons).

Unfortunately, we can’t make out the finer details of the skin as the images show him so small.

When is the Fortnite Ant-Man skin release date?

We don’t have the exact release date for the Ant-Man skin yet unfortunately. But, just based on previous teasers, we wouldn’t expect the wait to be too long.

Usually after a new portal is added in-game, and teasers start dropping, it’s only a matter of days before we can get our hands of the skin.

Continue Reading

Guides

How to disable pre-edits in Fortnite

After over a year of fan requests, Epic have added a ‘disable pre-edit’ option to Fortnite. Here’s where you can find it.

Published

on

In the v15.20 update, Epic Games added a much-requested setting to Fortnite: ‘disable pre-edits.’ Here’s how it works and how to select it.

Finally, after years of Reddit threads, Twitter posts, and pro players begging, Epic added a ‘disable pre-edit’ setting to Fortnite.

Here’s everything you need to know about the new setting, including how it works and where to find it.

What does ‘pre-editing’ mean?

Pre-editing refers to the ability to edit a structure before placing it. The most popular use of pre-edits throughout Fortnite history was a cone/ramp edit when controller players had to use Combat Pro.

Now, however, very few players use pre-edits. Instead, pre-edits offer an obstacle, as they’re almost always completed by mistake. Of course, there are still some niche applications for pre-edits, but most players wanted Epic to add an option to disable these edits.

How to disable pre-edits

You can find the new option under the settings tab (cog wheel) in the start menu. Scroll down to the “Building” section, and you’ll see four options. One of them is the new “Disable Pre-Edit Option.”

If you turn this off, you’ll no longer be able to edit structures before placing them – good news for the bulk of the Fortnite community.

If may have taken Epic years to add this option, but it’s finally here. Next stop, an FoV slider!

Continue Reading

Tips

How to use pre-editing to your advantage in Fortnite

Don’t turn off pre-edits so fast! Learn how to make pre-edits work for you in Fortnite with these new competitive strategies.

Published

on

Learn how to make pre-edits work for you in Fortnite with these competitive strategies.

Pre-edits in Fortnite can be maddening when you’re in the middle of a fight. More often than not, the pre-edits will work against you as you accidentally edit a hole in your floor or a window in your wall. Before you know it, you’re taking fall damage or getting shot because you hit the wrong button while battling someone.

Epic recently added a lon-requested setting to Fortnite, giving players the ability to toggle pre-edits on and off. Now, with a simple setting change, you’ll never need to worry about pre-edits again.

This doesn’t mean that pre-edits are entirely useless. In the patch before the setting change was released, pro player Maken used them expertly to outplay his opponent.

Useful pre-edits have also been posted to the r/FortniteCompetitive subreddit in the past. These pre-edits focus on cones, and give players the ability to fake-out opponents and even place their structures through turbo-builds.

The first strategy involves subverting the expectations of your opponent. Most skilled players anticipate edits, but using a pre-edited cone can get you a free shot.

As you can see, all you have to do is edit the wall, place your triangle cone, resent the cone edit, and shoot your opponent. There’s hardly anything they can do to prevent this free shot – especially since they aren’t going to see it coming.

The above clip from u/DemianNieuwenhuis has a very niche application. After all, using a regular cone is going to be far more useful in most situations. The only time your pre-edited cone will work is when someone is standing outside of your box.

This next clip is more of an exploit than anything. It also requires you to pre-edit your cone; this time in a V shape. You can exploit the new Turbo Building system and place the V-cone under your opponent’s ceiling after breaking their cone.

Again – like the other clip – this strategy will only be useful in certain situations. You won’t be able to cone-block opponents or even protect yourself from above if you run around with your cones all jacked up like this.

Still, these strategies are worth mentioning – especially if you find yourself in a 1v1. You can surprise your opponent with both of them, and steal some shots without taking damage.

Continue Reading