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A game of chess: an interview with a Fortnite cheat developer

We spoke with a cheat developer about cheating in Fortnite, the Fortnite anti-cheat, and the mentality of a cheat developer.

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On July 31, we covered the story of a Fortnite player known as Bman. Bman was exposed for allegedly using cheats during the Bugha Cup and Cash Cups leading up to this tournament. His trio teammates in the Bugha Cup were the ones to expose him.

Zykoma, one of Bman’s former teammates, tweeted several clips that showed Bman tracking players that should be invisible to him. In the tweet, he wrote, “I’m posting this to show how easily these hacks are accessible and can go multiple tournaments undetected.”

After discussing the topic with the players involved, I was sent some information on how Bman got these cheats. One thing led to another and I found myself in a Discord server for a cheat developer – selling cheats for Fortnite, PUBG, and Apex Legends. I was directed to one of the Discord admins and creators of the cheats. For the purpose of this article, he will be referred to as “Clay,” to avoid potential misuse of this feature for promotional purposes.

Clay agreed to be interviewed and provided some insight into cheating in Fortnite along with general information about himself and why he does what he does. According to Clay, he and his partner(s) sell one of the only effective cheats that gets through the Fortnite anti-cheat. He could not confirm nor deny whether these were the cheats that Bman used before his disqualification from the Bugha Cup.

I went into this conversation thinking that Clay would talk about the abundance of cheaters in Fortnite and how easy it is to get around their anti-cheat. I thought I’d find someone who just wants to watch the world burn – sending as many cheaters into a game as they could. As it turns out, neither assumption ended up being true. Let’s get into it.

An interview with a Fortnite cheat developer

People are calling out the Fortnite anti-cheat. Would the Valorant anti-cheat detect this type of cheat? I know that’s supposed to be much more advanced than other games.

The Valorant anti-cheat is definitely good, presumably the best anti-cheat since ESEA, both insanely invasive in ways that the communities have already found out about without any developers having to prove.

It’s highly unlikely that any anti-cheat can detect our cheat(s) as it’s operating at an extremely low level compared to what they’re used to, and if they could see how we do it then they’d most likely steal some of our ideas.

In Fortnite – with public tournaments and open qualifiers – there seems to be a lot more incentive to use cheats to earn money. The same is true for developing cheats, I assume.

To be honest, we love what we do, and making money is simply an addition to it, we don’t do this for a living or else we’d have many more customers.

Cheating has been around since forever, it has definitely changed and evolved from even year-to-year, but it’s still cheating. The difference is definitely huge between players using it for content or public matches, as opposed to using it to earn tons of money but along with that, there are also greater risks. When you start trying to use third-party software or even non-tool assisted cheating for money, that’s when legal actions begin to become a risk.

You said you do it for the love of the game and not for the money. What do you love about it? Getting around the system? Trying to have the best product?

Bypassing anti-cheats is a hobby, similar to how cheating in games is a hobby. It’s enjoyable to bypass something that isn’t supposed to be bypassed, and ahead of that we also provide for someone else’s hobby which is cheating in a game. The money made isn’t important, it’s a bonus to what we do.

We don’t even try to compete to have the best product, we’re known for having the most secure products for many years now but we don’t even attempt to mass-sell or advertise what we do, it simply comes to us because of how well we do it. It’s simply a hobby, and when you do it well, people realize it.

Besides, when we see anti-cheats doing illegal stuff like pulling information from user’s computers or even dumping memory – we want them to realize we can see what they’re doing. What we do is just as illegal as what they do, probably even less illegal as they’re doing it to millions of players. Well, it would be illegal but no one cares about the TOS each player agrees to. I guess cheaters and RE’s (reverse engineers) just enjoy being on the opposite side.

The prices you list are quite expensive for a hobby. What do you think people get out of cheating in a game if not money and notoriety? Calling it a hobby suggests that people are doing it for fun – not trying to earn money or make a name for themselves.

There are definitely people who just cheat as a hobby, it may require an investment but when there’s only one undetected cheat – people are willing to pay any price. Of course, there are people who also do it to gain an advantage and win tournaments, but those rarely ever continuously cheat.

Would you say that yours is the only undetectable cheat in a particular game?

In the specific game we’re talking about (Fortnite), yes. At least the only one undetected that isn’t extremely private and selling for over $2,000 a month.

Okay. So in your opinion, cheating in Fortnite isn’t as widespread as people seem to think it is? Right now, a lot of pros are suspicious.

Cheating with third-party programs isn’t as big as people think it is. There may be other forms of cheating, but not with third-party programs like this, as it’s extremely rare or difficult for someone to get their hands on something like this.

I did see someone named “Zygama” (Zykoma) or something like that saying something along the lines of “I want to spread awareness to show how easy it is for people to get cheats that can go multiple tournaments without being banned.” This is extremely false.

I’m in contact with many other developers and well-known cheaters who have tried numerous cheats and created cheats who haven’t even been able to go a few days without getting banned.

The cheat we’re offering isn’t something out of the ordinary, and we aren’t regular RE’s with basic knowledge. We’ve been making cheats for over a decade, and to make this cheat as safe and undetected as it has cost us many weeks of reversing and studying how the anti-cheats work, luckily we didn’t go out of our general knowledge as everything they do – we’ve already seen in previous anti-cheats.

Do you play Fortnite or any of the other games you have cheats for? When you do play, do you cheat?

I personally don’t play the games, or if I do play them it’s only with intentions to add/debug something about the cheat. I’m not entirely a gamer, not anymore at least.

“It bothers me when people say ‘fix your anti-cheat’ to developers who work day and night to catch a cheat that snuck past what they took months developing.”

Would you ever switch sides and work for the good guys, catching cheaters and making anti-cheats?

Creating an anti-cheat was something a colleague and I have thought about, but there’s something better about being the “bad guys”.

Besides, when you’re working on this side of the field not only are you learning the tricks anti-cheat developers are using, but you’re also using your full knowledge to create new ideas while also understanding other’s ideas. Which is something anti-cheat developers can’t do, unless they get access to that specific cheat.

I will say that it bothers me when people say “fix your anticheat” to developers who work day and night to catch a cheat that snuck past what they took months developing. They truly work hard, but it’s not an easy task to get rid of every single cheat available to people. Then when certain cheats like this one comes up, that they’ve never seen before or have an idea how it works – they can’t do anything but spend half of their salary on getting their hands on the cheat to detect it.

This cheat is definitely going to be something head-breaking for them to solve though, and they will learn a lot from it if, and only if they are able to figure out even a small portion of it.

I want to get back to the prevalence of cheating in Fortnite. This past weekend the topic blew up with the FNCS. Has anything changed or is that statement still true?

I don’t know of any cheats that are undetected, at all – other than us. I think Fortnite cheating is really dead, and I don’t see it taking any turn anytime soon. Specifically speaking about third-party program cheating, because other forms of cheating may definitely be common.

Of course, teaming and all of that, but we’ve seen a ton of clips of players with “suspicious” aim and tracking from this weekend. Do you think players are seeing something in clips that isn’t there or are more players actually using cheats?

We opened 5 slots prior to all of these tournaments. I’m not claiming any of those users are my customers and there have been numerous clips of people having suspicious aim who are simply just good.

It’s highly unlikely that these users are cheating, but I do think Fortnite is becoming scared of what’s going on and are enforcing bans without their anti-cheat picking up a clue. They’re definitely desperate to clean up their game, but as I said it’s highly unlikely that these players are using cheats unless they’re paying what they make from the tournaments to only keep the publicity.

Can you clarify what the “slots” mean?

We have limited slots for each product we offer in order to prevent an abundance of cheaters, it’s also an easier and more secure way to handle the cheats as opposed to mass-selling it. Usually, we have 25 slots for our products, but for Fortnite, we’d like it a bit more private as there are no other cheats that offer the security we offer.

Really, so at one time only 5 people were cheating using your cheats during the FNCS?

Correct, as I said it’s very rare to have secure cheats and we don’t want to hurt the game any more than we already do.

“This is definitely like a game of chess though, and I hope they’re enjoying it the way I am; except I’m a few moves ahead at the moment.”

You have an interesting stance on game development. Not wanting to hurt the game, standing up for anti-cheat developers, etc.

Truth is I like what I do, I’m not attempting to hurt anyone by doing this. There is a lot that could be bragged about, but there’s a limit to when you can brag.

The anti-cheat developers are trying their hardest, but there’s always someone who’s better, just as I’m sure there’s someone better than us – they just haven’t shown up yet. This is definitely like a game of chess though, and I hope they’re enjoying it the way I am; except I’m a few moves ahead at the moment.

The takeaway

My primary takeaway from this conversation was this: according to (self-proclaimed) one of the only successful Fortnite cheat providers on the internet, there aren’t a ton of cheaters in Fortnite, especially in official tournaments. There are, undoubtedly, people using third-party cheats in Fortnite tournaments, but they aren’t nearly as common as the professional community seems to think.

What’s more, the Fortnite anti-cheat – which has been getting a lot of flack from pros – is one of the better systems in gaming. It might not be as sophisticated as some, but it’s far better than the anti-cheat in other popular games. According to Clay, their cheats wouldn’t even be registered by the most stringent anti-cheats in gaming, anyway. If you take his claims at face value, then you acknowledge that he’s creating a cheat – unseen in gaming until now.

Cheating will always be a part of gaming. As Clay told me, it’s a game of chess between cheat and anti-cheat developers. There will always be people like Clay, who enjoy skirting the system by developing cheats. There will always be players who purchase these cheats as a way to gain an advantage – or to, simply, anger other players.

I decided to look at the silver lining of the information we received: cheating in Fortnite isn’t that bad. Third-party cheating Fortnite tournaments seems to be even less of an issue.

Sure, some people will get away with it and Epic can’t keep up with everyone. As players, all we can do is keep an eye out and report what we see without getting too paranoid. As Ballatw stated in a tweet, false and frivolous accusations only harm the community.

This appears to be the end of my communication with Clay, for now. He claims to have no knowledge of any particular players who are cheating in Fortnite – although I have my doubts about that. I wouldn’t expect him to admit it if he did. I’m taking some of his claims with a grain of salt, but feel as though he has no reason to lie about most of what he told me.

Hopefully, this interview gives players and developers alike more of an insight into the world of hacking in video games – specifically in Fortnite. Fortnite players can take some comfort in the knowledge that the anti-cheat is strong and catches most of the wrongdoers.

Some cheaters will always slip through the cracks, but those who use third-party software in tournaments are subject to legal action. It’s a huge risk that carries more of a punishment than public humiliation if a player is caught.

I can only hope that this information helps to give some competitive Fortnite players peace of mind, dissuades potential cheaters, and informs those who were interested ideology of a cheat developer. I’ll be answering some questions on the FortniteINTEL Twitter account, so make sure to follow us there.

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The 5 most hated skins in Fortnite

The Fortnite community is no fan of these skins.

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Fortnite skins have taken on a life of their own since the game came out. Back in the early days, we couldn’t imagine spending money on a free game. Now, hundreds of dollars later, we’re still padding our lockers as collectors of in-game cosmetics.

Some skins tell a lot about the player wearing them. A Peely? They’re just trying to goof around and have some fun. A Dynamo? Sweat is probably pouring onto their keyboard at all times.

Today, we’re taking a look at the most hated skins in Fortnite – the skins that elicit an immediate reaction from opponents. You better be ready for some backlash if you post a clip while wearing one of these skins.

5. Female Soccer Skins

Female Soccer Skins have been hated ever since they first came out. This might have been the first “sweaty” skin to come to Fortnite, and it remains in the category to this day. However, it’s been made available in the Item Shop quite frequently so everyone from sweats to casuals owns it.

“Soccer skin” means more than just the skin that someone is wearing, at this point. It’s a term that longtime Fortnite players will likely remember for the rest of their gaming careers. However, because of its frequent item shop appearances, it’s last on the list.

fortnite soccer celebration
Via: Epic Games

4. Custom Superhero Skins

These skins have cause quite a stir with players and have disrupted the competitive scene on more than one occasion. The actual name of these skins is Boundless, and they are among the most customizable skins in the game. Many players bought them for their versatility at first, but they were quickly abused by competitive players.

Players could set their skins to have an all-black or all-white color scheme which would make them harder to see. These color combos were banned from the game, but players still found a way to make their skins harder to see. This lead to these sweaty skins being banned outright in all competitive play.

3. Anime Skins

This category of skins is pretty new since “anime” skins were introduced in Chapter 2 Season 5. A bundle of anime skins was also released during Season 6 which contains some of the sweatiest and most hated Fortnite Skins.

Chigusa, Megumi, and Yuki are part of the Cyber Infiltration bundle, and Lexa was given to players who reached a certain level of the Season 5 Battle Pass. For some reason, players hate these cell-shaded skins and would rather face off against Soccer Skins.

2. Surf Witch

When we asked Twitter which skins they hated the most, a large number of responses included Surf Witch. It seems this skin is hated because it’s used by “sweats” and also because of its lackluster design.

Surf Witch’s design isn’t much different from many of the other female skins. In fact, she has a very similar design to Haze, a preexisting skin. Many players think that Surf Witch is a cheap rip off of Haze, and their hate is derived from their similarities.

1. Dynamo

Dynamo is – by far – the most hated skin in Fortnite, at the moment. If you post a clip while wearing the Dynamo skin, you’re guaranteed to see the bulk of your replies consist of something along the lines of, “Dynamo, ew.”

We’re not exactly sure why Dynamo has its status as the most hated skin in Fortnite. Perhaps, it’s because Dynamo a very sweaty skin that isn’t difficult to get. Unlike Crystal and Aura, a lot of players think Dynamo is, simply, a bad skin on top of the fact that it’s incredibly sweaty.

Whatever the reason, wearing a Dynamo skin puts a target on your back. If you hit the island wearing Dynamo, then you better be as good as the skin suggests you are.

Epic Games

Does this list mean that you shouldn’t be wearing these skins in Fortnite? Absolutely not. In fact, a lot of players like playing the role of an antagonist in all sorts of games. It can be fun. Wear whatever you want – these are just some of the skins that are in the community’s crosshairs at the moment. We’re sure that it will change in the future. Wear what you want and have fun!

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How to get Fortnite Inflate-A-Bulls and how to use them

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Fortnite Inflate-A-Bull

Epic Games have added another disguise to Fortnite Season 8 following the v17.10 update, and they’re called Inflate-A-Bulls.

If you ever wanted to tip-toe around the Fortnite world hidden in a cow costume, well, now is your chance!

On July 13, 2021, Epic posted a new update on their official live blog, confirming the Inflate-A-Bull has been added to the game.

Now, you’re going to need to know how to use it, and where to find them – because they look like a lot of fun.

How to use Fortnite Inflate-A-Bull

Fortnite Inflate-A-Bulls can be attached to your back and can be – shock horror – inflated to bounce or roll away from dangerous scenarios.

Essentially, they may save your life during close gunfights.

Quick tips!

Even if a player shoots your way and pops the inflatable, you will be protected from the damage.

Epic have also released a quick tip for players to follow as well, to get the most out of this strange disguise. They posted: “Tip: Rolling downhill with an Inflate-A-Bull is a LOT faster than just running downhill”.

Where to find Fortnite Inflate-A-Bull

These pesky disguises can be found in two ways: IO Chests and normal Chests.

Guarantee yourself one of these items at this location, where Rick Sanchez will wait for you.

However, there is one NPC on the Fortnite island selling these as well – Rick Sanchez. For those who don’t know, Sanchez can be found at the IO Base east of Weeping Woods (seen above).

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Fortnite LeBron James skin: Release date, price, trailer & more

A LeBron James Fortnite skin is reportedly being added to the game during the next update, and he will come with exclusive quests.

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lebron james fortnite skin space jam

NBA superstar LeBron James has officially joined Fortnite’s ICON Series skin set, with two outfits coming to the Fortnite Item Shop.

During the first day of the Epic Games vs. Apple trial, multiple planned or scrapped Fortnite crossovers had been leaked. The crossover information came from a Quarterly Business Review document for Epic Games. Among these leaks were planned crossovers with Naruto, Metroid, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, and more.

A crossover with LeBron James was also found in the court documents. The still image of LeBron James included the Icon Series logo. Players assumed a LeBron James Fortnite skin would be released during the Fortnite x NBA The Crossover event, but a set of customizable skins was released instead.

Epic Games put rumors to bed with an announcement on their official blog page on July 12, confirming the date NBA’s MVP would be arriving in the world-famous Battle Royale.

He joins a list of celebrities to now have their own character in-game, including Marshmello, Ninja, Loserfruit, and more.

When is Fortnite’s LeBron James skin coming out?

Here’s a first look at both of LeBron James’ Fortnite skins.

On July 14, 2021, LeBron James will be given his very own Fortnite Battle Royale skin, as part of the ICON Series.

How much is Fortnite’s LeBron James skin?

Fortnite ICON Series skins usually cost around 1,500 V-Bucks individually, with a price point of between 2,500 or 3,000 V-Bucks for the full bundle.

What does the King James Gear Bundle include?

  • The Lion Pickaxe 
  • Wingspan Glider
  • Quiet the competition with LeBron’s emphatic on-the-court celebration, The Silencer. 

A new trailer dropped as part of the announcement, too, as seen below.

Fortnite LeBron James skin trailer

Leaks

A number of these details were revealed before Epic Games had the chance to do a full press release, too.

ShiinaBR on Twitter was the first to break the news stating: “LEBRON JAMES WILL BE THE NEXT ICON SERIES SKIN.”

HYPEX quote retweeted Shiina’s announcement with more information. They stated that the LeBron James Fortnite skin will come with an exclusive quest line called King’s Bling.

And now LeBron James will be added to the game right before the release of Space Jam: A New Legacy.

For basketball fans, this is an exciting addition to Fortnite. Not only can players equip their own custom basketball skins, but now they can play as one of the greatest to ever play the game of basketball. Let us know down below if you are excited about the collab and if you plan to purchase the LeBron James Fortnite skin.

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